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CSR Names Three New Appointees

Dr. Alexandra Ainsztein is now the scientific review administrator for the cell development and function 4 study section at the Center for Scientific Review, after participating in CSR's Review Internship Program. She previously was an intramural research training associate at NICHD, where she worked in its section on cell cycle regulation studying the role of SUMO-1 enzymes in cell division. Ainsztein received a Ph.D. in biochemistry and molecular biology from the University of Florida in Gainesville. Her research there focused on the dynamics of microtubule proteins that help form the intracellular substrate or cytoskeleton. Before coming to NIH, Ainsztein conducted postdoctoral studies on the role of centromere proteins in cell division at Johns Hopkins University and the University of Edinburgh in Scotland.

Dr. Theresa Montini is now the scientific review administrator for the AIDS and related research 7 study section at the Center for Scientific Review. Her study section reviews research proposals on behavioral and social science aspects of preventing HIV transmission and infection. Montini holds an M.S.W. from the University of California-Berkeley, and a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of California-San Francisco, where she studied women's activism for breast cancer informed consent laws. She received a postdoctoral fellowship from the National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism to study community organizing to limit alcohol availability in inner-city neighborhoods. Montini then taught sociology and social work at the University of Hawaii-Manoa, Whittier College and the California State Polytechnic University. Before coming to CSR, she conducted tobacco control research at the University of California-San Francisco.

Dr. Kenneth Roebuck is the new scientific review administrator of the AIDS and related research 1 study section at the Center for Scientific Review. He comes to CSR from Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke's Medical Center. As an associate professor of immunology and microbiology there, he studied regulatory mechanisms of HIV gene expression. Roebuck earned his Ph.D. in molecular biology from the University of California-San Diego and San Diego State University. His research there focused on the transcriptional regulation of small nuclear RNA genes. In postdoctoral research at UC-San Diego, he studied the role of an activating protein (AP-1) on HIV gene expression and the regulation and activation of HIV in intestinal epithelial cells.


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