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NIH Record

Safe Computing in Unsafe Times

Computer security threats come in many guises, ranging from break-ins over the Internet to email spamming and misuse of government computing resources. Nowadays, every NIH computer user and system administrator needs to know safe computing practices that protect the integrity of data and the security of computing systems.

Is my electronic mail really private? What are my legal rights online? Can lawsuits result from online communications? Everyday users as well as those who manage systems will find answers to these and many other questions by attending a 1-day conference on information technology security, to be held Thursday, Apr. 2 from 8:45 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the Natcher Conference Center.

The conference kicks off with a keynote speech by Bob Aiken, network resources and Next Generation Internet program director at the Department of Energy, on "Security Challenges of the Next Generation Internet."

"The problems we now face with securing our networks and online resources will only be magnified by the technological advances introduced by the Next Generation Internet," says Aiken. "To secure or not to secure won't be the question -- it will be when, how, and at what cost."

The afternoon keynote speaker, Dr. Mark Boster, deputy chief information officer for the Department of Justice and chair of the security subcommittee of the Federal Chief Information Officers Council, will address future directions in IT security with a focus on training, interoperability, security management, and identification of best practices. Breakout sessions cover firewalls, computer fraud, Internet threats, antivirus software, encryption and PKI technology, Cyber Law, and other topics.

The conference, sponsored by the Office of Information Resources Management, is free and open to all NIH and HHS staff. To register or for details about the program, see the OIRM Web site at http://wwwoirm.nih.gov. Sign language interpretation will be provided for the keynote addresses. To request other accommodations, call IQ Solutions at (301) 984-1471 by Mar. 16.

Questions? Call 402-4459.


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