Front Page

Previous Story

Next Story

NIH Record vertical blue bar column separator

News Briefs graphic

APAO Elects Leadership, Plans Potluck

The NIH Asian Pacific Islander American Organization (APAO) membership recently elected its new executive board and council members for fiscal year 2001. The board consists of Lucie Chen, president; Prahlad Mathur, vice president; JoAnne Wong, executive secretary; and Lydia Luh, treasurer. Council members are Aftab Ansari, Bill Bunnag, Chong Chung, Yoshiko Doherty, Molly Eng, Zongyi Hu, Hameed Khan, Sunnie Kim, George Nhu, Janet Nguyen, Patricia Reyes, Hari Singh, Rashimi Gopal-Srivastava, Gopal Sharma, Sheo Shanker Singh and Wendy Wang.

The APAO meets on the third Tuesday of each month from noon to 1:30 p.m. Its meeting schedule can be viewed at http://www.recgov.org/r&w/apao/meetings.htm. All members and their guests are invited to the annual potluck luncheon to be held on Tuesday, Dec. 19 at noon in Wilson Hall, Bldg. 1. The menu includes a variety of dishes representing various Asian/Pacific Islander American groups. If interested, contact JoAnne Wong at 496-9147.

New FAES Music Course

A new music course will be offered in the FAES graduate school during the spring semester. The course will consist of a lecture-performance series on the 16 Beethoven string quartets. Each session will include a lecture with musical examples, followed by a complete live performance. For more information or to register for the course, contact the Foundation for Advanced Education in the Sciences, 496-7976, or visit www.faes.org.

FAES Announces Spring Courses

The FAES Graduate School at NIH announces the schedule of courses for the spring semester. The evening classes sponsored by the Foundation for Advanced Education in the Sciences will be given on the NIH campus.

Courses are offered in biochemistry, biology, biotechnology (daytime courses), chemistry, imaging sciences, immunology, languages, medicine, microbiology, pharmacology, psychiatry, statistics, toxicology, administration and courses of general interest.

It is often possible to transfer credits earned to other institutions for degree work, and many courses are approved for category 1 credit toward the AMA Physician's Recognition Award.

Classes will begin Jan. 29; mail registration ends Dec. 29 and walk-in registration will be held Jan. 3-9. Tuition is $100 per credit hour, and courses may be taken for credit or audit. Courses that qualify for institute support as training should be cleared with supervisors and administrative officers as soon as possible. Both the vendor's copy of the training form and the FAES registration form must be submitted at the time of registration. Note that FAES cannot access training forms entered in the NIHTS system; a signed hard copy (vendors' copy of SF 182 form) is needed in order to process registrations for classes.

Schedules will be available in the graduate school office in Bldg. 60, Suite 230, the foundation bookstore in Bldg. 10, Rm. B1L101, and the business office in Bldg. 10, Rm. B1C18. To have a schedule sent, call 496-7976 or visit the FAES web site at http://www.faes.org.

New NCI Lecture Series Under Way

By Nicole Gottlieb

The NCI Office of Communications and the Office of Education and Special Initiatives (OESI) recently launched a seminar series. Dr. Joseph V. Henderson, director of the Interactive Medical Library at Dartmouth Medical School gave the inaugural talk and demonstration. His "virtual reality clinic" was both educational and entertaining, as conference attendees experienced firsthand the comprehensive, interactive program developed for health professionals and students.

"The important things are best learned through interactivity," said Henderson. To that end, he showed the audience how a user can choose to enter a clinic room to see a patient and decide how to handle various patient issues; to go into a virtual viewing room where one can listen to personal experiences, view a short lecture, or take brief quizzes; or to convene a meeting with colleagues in the virtual conference room.

You can read more about Henderson's work at http://iml.dartmouth.edu. The HIV/AIDS program that he used as a demonstration, as well as programs about cancer treatment, will be available on that web site in the near future.

Upcoming OC/OESI Friday seminar speakers include: Gary Kreps, chief of NCI's Health Communications and Informatics Research Branch, on Dec. 8; and Anne Thomas, NIH associate director for communications, on Jan. 12, 2001. Sign language interpreters will be provided. For more information or to request reasonable accommodation, contact Robin Cline at 496-6792.

WFLC Seminars Scheduled

Below are the Work and Family Life Center "Faces & Phases of Life" seminars still open for December:

Life Coping Skills (& Avoiding the Pitfalls)
Tuesday, Dec. 5, 1-2:30 p.m., 31/6C6

Stress Management
Tuesday, Dec. 12, noon-1:30 p.m., 31/6C6

Preregister for all seminars by calling WFLC, 435-1619, TTY/TDD: 480-0690. Sign language interpretation will be provided. For other reasonable accommodation, call WFLC at least 48 hours prior to the seminar. For a full schedule of "Faces & Phases of Life," visit http://wflc.od.nih.gov. Can't make it to a seminar? You can watch on the NIH videocasting web site, http://videocast.nih.gov. All seminars are presented free of charge.

NIH Chamber Singers Holiday Concert

The NIH Chamber Singers holiday concert features Alfred Burt carols, Hanukkah songs, a cappella favorites by Porter, Hindemith, Brahms, Mozart and Sharon. There will be two performances in the Clinical Center: Tuesday, Dec. 12, noon, Masur Auditorium; and Thursday, Dec. 14, 7:30 p.m., 14th floor assembly hall. Admission is free. For more information, see http://www.recgov.org/r&w/chamber/ or call 435-3209.

Renewal of NIH Parking Permits

NIH parking permits for off-campus employees will expire on the last day of December 2000. In order to obtain an off-campus permit, an employee must visit the NIH Parking Office in Bldg. 31, Rm. B3B04. Hours are 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday through Friday. Permits may also be obtained at the following off-campus locations: Rockledge II on Dec. 12 from 10 a.m. to noon in Conf. Rm. 9104 and EPN on Dec. 13 from 1 to 2:30 p.m. in Conf. Rm. C. Remember to bring a valid NIH identification card, driver's license and vehicle registration certificate. For more information, call 496-6851.

Holiday Show Set, Dec. 14

For some joyful holiday spirit, plan to attend the 16th annual NIH Holiday Show presented by the Bethesda Little Theatre. The performance will be held on Thursday, Dec. 14 at noon in Masur Auditorium, Bldg. 10. Come and enjoy a variety of tunes in celebration of the holiday season. The Bethesda Little Theatre is an R&W organization whose proceeds benefit NIH charities. The show is BLT's gift to the NIH community in thanks for their support throughout the year. For more information, visit http://www.recgov.org/r&w/blt/.

'Messiah' Sing-Along, Dec. 10

The fourth annual Messiah Sing-Along will take place on Sunday, Dec. 10 at 3 p.m. in Masur Auditorium, Bldg. 10. Presented by the NIH Community Orchestra and the Bethesda Little Theatre, this popular event will feature the orchestra along with a chorus and soloists. Come prepared to sing your part or just listen and enjoy the music. There will be scores available for borrowing. The suggested donation of $10 will benefit NIH charities. For more information, visit http://www.gprep.org/~music/nih or call (301) 897-8184.

Hispanic Heritage Month Speakers

At left, Dr. Carlos Carmargo , assistant professor of medicine at Harvard, discusses "Body Mass Index and Risk of Developing Asthma" at part two of NIH's Hispanic Heritage Month observance, Bridging the Gap in Health Disparities. At right, Dr. Amelie Ramirez , deputy director of the Chronic Disease Prevention and Control Research Center at Baylor College of Medicine, delivers a talk on "Hispanics and Cancer: Charting a Course for the Future," the final lecture of the month's celebration sponsored by more than a dozen NIH components

NINDS Funds Three New Programs at Minority Institutions

As part of its initiative to promote and enhance neuroscience research at minority institutions, the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, in collaboration with the National Center for Research Resources, recently funded three new Specialized Neuroscience Research Programs (SNRPs). The programs at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, Meharry Medical College and Hunter College seek to encourage neuroscience graduate education among minority students and to stimulate new research on brain and nervous system disorders affecting minorities.

NINDS' support for these and other SNRPs is part of a larger effort to improve the health status of minority Americans and eliminate healthcare disparities through the funding of new neuroscience research by and for minorities. The National Institute of Mental Health collaborated with NINDS on the University of Alaska Fairbanks program.

"The institutions we've chosen are specially prepared to educate and guide young minority scientists," said Alfred Gordon, director of the Office of Special Programs in Neuroscience, NINDS, and lead administrator of the SNRP initiative. "Through these awards, NINDS helps to develop the careers of future neuroscience health professionals who can assist us in reducing disease disparities in populations at increased risk for disorders of the nervous system."

Funding for the programs allows the institutions to build or enhance research facilities, to develop additional neuroscience educational programs and to strengthen the research capabilities of faculty and students.

NIA Exercise Video at R&W Stores

Here are the top 10 reasons to buy the Exercise with the National Institute on Aging video at NIH's Recreation and Welfare Association stores: It is based on sound scientific research funded by NIH; it is inexpensive; it comes with the offer of a free 100-page companion book; it makes a great gift for mom, dad, other relatives and friends; participants receive an NIA certificate of achievement for sticking with the program for 1 month; Margaret Richard, who leads the exercises, is a well-known fitness guru seen on public television; the physically robust astronaut John Glenn supports the NIA's exercise guide; it's never too late to start exercising; it is geared specifically to aging boomers and seniors; it emphasizes strength, flexibility, balance and endurance exercises for a well-rounded workout.

The video is available now at R&W stores in Bldgs. 10, 31, Rockledge and Executive Plaza South. To view an online clip of the video, go to http://www.maillist.org/exercise.


Up to Top