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Baltimore Gives Khoury Lecture

Dr. David Baltimore, Nobel Prize winner and president of California Institute of Technology, will present this year's George Khoury Lecture on Dec. 10, at 3 p.m. in Masur Auditorium, Bldg. 10. His talk is entitled "Cell Life and Cell Death."

In 1975, Baltimore became one of the youngest recipients of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. He shared the prize with Drs. Howard Temin of the University of Wisconsin and Renato Dulbecco of the Salk Institute for "discoveries concerning the interaction between tumor viruses and the genetic material of the cell."

Dr. David Baltimore

In 1970, simultaneously with Temin, he discovered the enzyme reverse transcriptase, which enables cancer-inducing RNA viruses to replicate within the host organism. The enzyme also made possible many of the developments in biotechnology that were to follow, and its presence in human immunodeficiency virus allowed the cause of AIDS to be uncovered.

Baltimore was recently named chairman of the AIDS vaccine research committee to help coordinate AIDS vaccine research and development across NIH. In 1986, he cochaired a major study of AIDS, sponsored by the National Academy of Sciences and the Institute of Medicine.

Baltimore has been elected to the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He was also appointed to the Pontifical Academy of Sciences, an international body of distinguished scientists. He is also an elected foreign member of the Royal Society (England), and a member of the Institute of Medicine.

The Khoury Lecture was organized by NIH scientists to honor the memory of Dr. George Khoury, who had just been elected to the National Academy of Sciences when he died of lymphoma complications at age 43. Khoury was highly regarded as a superb scientist and Sciences, an international body of distinguished scientists. He is also an elected foreign member of the Royal Society (England), and a member of the Institute of Medicine.

The Khoury Lecture was organized by NIH scientists to honor the memory of Dr. George Khoury, who had just been elected to the National Academy of Sciences when he died of lymphoma complications at age 43. Khoury was highly regarded as a superb scientist and as a caring mentor of the postdoctoral fellows in his laboratory. This is the fourth lecture in the series and the tenth anniversary of Khoury's death.


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