skip navigation
Vol. LVIII, No. 9
May 5, 2006
cover

previous story

next story
Zerhouni To Speak on Medical Imaging

NIH director Dr. Elias Zerhouni will present the lecture "Medical Imaging: Innovation, Integration and Improvement," on Monday, May 8 at the University of Washington's Seattle campus. The lecture will be webcast live on ResearchChannel (www.researchchannel.org) from 8 to 9:30 p.m. ET.

The lecture will be broadcast on television and webcast again at various hours May 28, June 1 and June 2. To see where the program will be televised and for additional broadcast times, visit www.researchchannel.org/wheretowatch. The lecture will also be added to the ResearchChannel online video library (www.researchchannel.org/medicalimaging) for on-demand viewing.

ResearchChannel is a nonprofit media and technology organization that connects a global audience with research and academic institutions.

NIH Philharmonia Orchestra Concert, May 13

The NIH Philharmonia Orchestra will present its fourth concert of the season on Saturday, May 13 at 7:30 p.m. at St. Elizabeth Catholic Church in Rockville. The all-Mozart concert is free, but donations are welcome. The church is located at 917 Montrose Rd. between Rockville Pike and I-270. The concert includes: Adagio and Fugue for Strings; Wind Serenade in E flat major; Piano Concerto no. 17. The orchestra is conducted by Dr. Nancia D'Alimonte, an Eastman graduate and musical director of the George Washington University Orchestra. Most members of the orchestra work at NIH. For more information, visit www.NIHPhil.org.

Fauci To Give Leiter Lecture, May 10

NIAID director Dr. Anthony Fauci will give the 2006 Joseph Leiter Lecture on Wednesday, May 10 from 1:30 to 3 p.m. in Lister Hill Auditorium, Bldg. 38A. He will discuss "Pandemic Influenza and Other Emerging Infectious Diseases: Public Health Threat and Research Agenda." A reception follows the talk.

Symposium on Health Communication, May 10

An NCI symposium titled, "Advancing the Science, Extending the Reach, and Improving the Effectiveness of Health Communication," will be held at the Natcher Conference Center on Wednesday, May 10 from 3 to 5 p.m., followed from 5 to 6 p.m. by more than 20 state-of-the-science interactive demonstrations and exhibits.

Research from the Centers of Excellence in Cancer Communication Research will be presented by their principal investigators.

The goal of the symposium is to illustrate the novelty and scope of the research being conducted by the Centers of Excellence, as well as the potential of cancer communication science to improve health and reduce health disparities. All are welcome to attend. No registration is necessary. For more information contact Dr. Linda Harris at (301) 451-9477 or harrisl@mail.nih.gov.

Help for Your Older Relative

The Work and Family Life Center will hold a seminar titled, "Supporting Your Older Relative: Legal & Financial Considerations," on Wednesday, May 24 from noon to 1:30 p.m. in Bldg. 50, Rm. 1227/1233. Has an aging parent or relative called upon you yet for help with decision-making about legal and financial issues? Being knowledgeable about such topics can be a tremendous help when that time comes, either for you or a relative. Attend this seminar to be better prepared to give effective support and learn about issues you may face in the future, e.g., how to pay for homecare and medical expenses, how to appeal a Medicare decision, commonly used legal vehicles and how and when to use legal tools.

NCI Offers Breast Cancer DVD/Video

NCI announces the availability of a new educational DVD/video, Moving Beyond Breast Cancer, to help women know what to expect as they finish breast cancer treatment.

Finishing treatment is a much-awaited milestone and most women are eager to put the cancer experience behind them and get back to normal. Yet the period of time just after treatment ends (called the re-entry phase) can be difficult. As the intensity of their treatment experience wanes, women are often caught in a gap between wanting to return to normal, feeling like a different person from the experience and not necessarily having the support to handle the emotions and reactions that may develop after treatment ends.

The 23-minute DVD/video features vignettes of women in different life stages who share their concerns and experiences about body changes, emotions, relationships and new perspectives. Dr. Susan Love, breast cancer surgeon, shares medical insight on common reactions women have after breast cancer treatment in each of these areas.

To obtain a copy, call the Cancer Information Service toll-free at 1-800-4-CANCER (1-800-422-6237) or visit www.cancer.gov.

Asian and Pacific Islander American Heritage Month Observance

Everyone is invited to the 2006 NIH Asian/Pacific Islander American Heritage Month Program. The theme for the 34th anniversary observance is "Progress with Pride and Partnership." The observance consists of two events, an Ethnic Food Fair and a cultural dance festival.

On Friday, May 19 from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., on the Bldg. 31A patio, an Ethnic Food Fair will consist of local Asian restaurants showcasing their foods.

On Friday, May 26 from 5 to 6:30 p.m. in Masur Auditorium, Bldg. 10, the cultural program will feature Chinese, Indian, Korean and Indonesian dances and musical performances. NIAAA director Dr. Ting-Kai Li will present the keynote address. Immediately following the program, a reception will be held in the old Visitor Information Center exhibit gallery; guests can meet the performers and sample Asian foods.

Travel Contract Migrates to HHS

The contract governing staff travel will transition from the NIH Travel Management Center into the HHS Master TMC effective May 15. HHS has established a single TMC contract with Omega World Travel that is overseen by the Program Support Center. The HHS contract will continue to provide the NIH community with transportation and travel-related services, including airfare, train, bus, lodging and rental car services for federal travelers.

Marisa Sheelor will remain the primary point of contact for all NIH staff travel requirements. All travel-related complaints, compliments and inquiries should continue to be forwarded to her for processing with PSC.

The current methods for requesting travel reservations will remain in place. Staff travelers will still be able to submit a travel request form using the www.nihtravel.com web site.

Shortly after the May transition, NIH will deploy GetThere, a new self-serve, online travel booking system available for domestic travel reservations only. This tool will reduce the TMC service fees and allow travel planners and travelers the opportunity to view various costs for airlines, hotels and rental cars and book the reservations.

Effective May 15, all NIH staff travel will use the Centralized Call Center in Jacksonville, N.C. The following toll-free NIH number, fax number and email address will be available for travel reservations made with Omega World Travel: 800-419-2312; 866-657-0070; nihmd@owt.net.

Conference planning will not be available under the HHS Master TMC contract. All such services will be administered through the HHS Events Management Services Contract mechanism.

For more information about the HHS Master TMC contract, contact Sheelor at (301) 451-9299.

ORF Adds More Eco-Friendly Pest Control to NIH

The Office of Research Facilities continues to add wildlife to the campus. Ed Pfister (top), environmental compliance officer, ORF Division of Environmental Protection, releases masses of wood frog and spotted salamander eggs into a shallow stormwater holding pond off Wilson Drive at East Drive along the newly restored campus creek. Lynn Mueller (bottom), chief of grounds maintenance and landscaping, ORF Division of Property Management, releases 17 adult American toads along with their eggs into the pond. These amphibians, long absent from the NIH landscape, will add to the diversity of campus wildlife. The amphibians and their future offspring will control insect pests attracted to the pond, eliminating the need for chemical intervention.

NIAID Seminar on Cluster Computing

A course on "Cluster Computing for Bioinformatics: How to use simple web entry forms on the NIAID Bioinformatics Portal for protein modeling and phylogenetic analysis" will be offered Tuesday, May 9 from 10 to 11:30 a.m. in Bldg. 50, Rm. 6334.

The seminar will introduce scientists to the NIAID Bioinformatics Portal; a set of simple entry forms for the most popular bioinformatics applications. Cluster manager Jai-wei Gan will start the seminar with an introduction followed by live demonstrations. Protein modeling specialist Dr. Darrell Hurt will conduct the hands-on exercise. For more information and to register, email shahsheetal@mail.nih.gov.

Parenting Festival Set, May 10

The fourth annual NIH Parenting Festival will be held Wednesday, May 10 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the first floor conference area of Bldg. 50. As in past years, there will be representatives from many institutes who will share information about NIH science having to do with children and families. NIH support services for health, travel, finance, benefits and work life will also participate. There will be activities, prizes and free resources for all employees. The event is sponsored by the NIH Child Care Board, the NIH Work/Life Center and the ORS Division of Employee Services. For more information call (301) 402-8180 or email savaresm@mail.nih.gov.

Symposium on Genomics of Critical Illness, Injury

The fourth symposium on the "Functional Genomics of Critical Illness and Injury — Surviving Stress: From Organ Systems to Molecules," will be held Nov. 13-14 at the Natcher conference center, sponsored by NIGMS and the Clinical Center's critical care medicine department. There will be five scientific sessions. Abstracts are due by Sept. 8. For more information and to register, visit www.strategicresults.com/fg4.

SIDS Prevention, Public Trust Get Boost In Cincinnati

NICHD joined with the Sudden Infant Death Network of Ohio and the Ohio department of health in Cincinnati recently to sponsor the first annual "SIDS Risk Reduction Sunday." Pastors throughout the state informed their congregants about how they can reduce sudden infant death syndrome risk by placing infants on their backs to sleep, placing infants to sleep on a firm mattress and keeping all soft toys and loose bedding out of the sleep area. NICHD deputy director Dr. Yvonne Maddox (r), who also cochairs NIH's Public Trust Initiative, spoke at area events promoting SIDS Sunday activities. She emphasized the importance of people participating in clinical studies as full partners in the medical research enterprise. In addition, she noted, NIH is committed to developing more collaborations with community organizations and other groups who can help build trust in medical research, particularly among underrepresented populations. With Maddox are (from l) Barbara Lattur, executive director, Sudden Infant Death Network of Ohio; Congresswoman Jean Schmidt (R-OH); Stacy Scott, Sudden Infant Death Network of Ohio; and Rhonda Haynes, documentary filmmaker and director of Bringin' in Da Spirit, an inspirational documentary about the history of African-American nurse-midwives. The film premiered at the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center in Cincinnati.

back to top of page