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Vol. LVIII, No. 21
October 20, 2006
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Basketball Theme Encourages Team Spirit
NIH Kicks Off CFC Campaign

On the front page...

Under a bright blue sky with a mild breeze blowing and the rousing sounds of the H.D. Woodson High School pep band filling the air, NIH kicked off the 2006 Combined Federal Campaign Oct. 3 in front of Bldg. 31’s C wing. More than 500 people attended the event that also featured the St. John’s College High School color guard, a charity fair and a basketball free-throw contest.

“This year we have recast the CFC as a basketball season,” said NIDCR director Dr. Lawrence Tabak, whose institute is leading this year’s campaign. “We’ve even dubbed you the Commissioner of NIH Basketball,” he told NIH director Dr. Elias Zerhouni, after thanking him for attending the kick-off and for his support of the CFC. Addressing the crowd, Tabak said, “You keyworkers are the team captains and the people in your offices are your players. It is your job to give leadership for the CFC among your teammates.

Continued...


  NIDCR director Dr. Lawrence Tabak shoots free throws at the CFC kickoff on Oct. 3.  
  NIDCR director Dr. Lawrence Tabak shoots free throws at the CFC kickoff on Oct. 3.  

We want the charities and the people they help to be the winners.
How you play the game will matter,” he said. “Your energy and
your skills will make a difference.”

Tabak also had a surprise for the crowd. “To show you how
far Dr. Zerhouni will go to show he’s on your team, NIH’s
2006 CFC produced a special poster,” he said. To approving
applause from the audience, he unveiled a poster that shows
Zerhouni, in shirtsleeves and a loosened tie, slam-dunking
a basketball.

Zerhouni had a surprise of his own. He offered an incentive to
NIH employees to exceed last year’s contributions of slightly
more than $2 million: The NIH director announced that he
would grow a beard if NIH surpassed the 2005 number.
Tabak could even dictate what style the beard should be,
Zerhouni said to laughter and applause.

FNIH board chairman Dr. Charles Sanders (l) spoke, along with NIH director Dr. Elias Zerhouni, at the recent Biomarkers Consortium announcement at the National Press Club. Master of ceremonies Johnny Holliday, radio personality and the voice of University of Maryland basketball and football, touched on the topic of a basketball free throw as a metaphor for the campaign. Whether you’re an NBA great or a grade-school player, he said, you get the same shot at the free-throw line. And like the basketball free throw, he continued, each team member at NIH should “step up to the line” and give it their best shot. He reminded attendees that every dollar, like every free throw, counts.

In a talk that illustrated how CFC contributions help real people, Mary Kaye Richter, head of the National Foundation for Ectodermal Dysplasias, spoke about the importance of CFC donations to organizations such as hers. NFED serves families affected by ectodermal dysplasia syndromes. Those born with the disorder lack many or all of their teeth, most of their hair and the ability to sweat normally. Depending on the condition—there are more than 150 clinically recognized manifestations of EDS—most kids with the disorder typically need wigs, access to air conditioning and dentures or dental implants, which have been reported recently to run as high as $40,000 per jaw.

 

NIH director Dr. Elias Zerhouni (l) and NIDCR director Dr. Lawrence Tabak arrive at the opening ceremony, held on the plaza between Bldg. 31C and the new Bldg. 33.

Top:
Spirited members of the H.D. Woodson High School
pep band filled the CFC kickoff with music and
excitement on Oct. 3.

Above:
NIH director Dr. Elias Zerhouni (l) and NIDCR director
Dr. Lawrence Tabak arrive at the opening ceremony,
held on the plaza between Bldg. 31C and the new
Bldg. 33.

Richter said donations from federal employees really make a difference in the life of the nonprofits. “In our case, the CFC money goes into our family services fund. That’s where we help kids find treatment, educate families and practitioners and assist with sorting out insurance claims,” she said. “It’s the difference between cutting a program in the family services fund or keeping it going.”

Like Zerhouni, Richter had an incentive for NIH’ers to get their pledge cards in: She promised a cheesecake to every IC that meets its goal by Dec. 8.

After the speeches, the crowd gathered around the makeshift basketball court where Tabak and representatives from almost every IC stepped up to the line to sink as many free throws as possible in 30 seconds. Tabak held his own, making 7; the winner, making 10 shots, was Larry Wongus of ORF, who was awarded a basketball signed by Maryland basketball head coach Gary Williams. Wongus also won an iPod for ORF that will be given to a deserving CFC keyworker or contributor in that organization. NIH Record Icon

Radio personality Johnny Holliday poses with Mary Kaye Richter, head of the National Foundation for Ectodermal Dysplasias, prior to the festivities.
Nothin’ But Net—ORF’s Larry Wongus accepts congratulations from CFC facilitator Kristin Oliver after he won the free-throw contest. He received a basketball signed by Gary Williams, head coach of the University of Maryland men’s team.

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