skip navigation nih record
Vol. LVIII, No. 23
November 17, 2006
cover

previous story

next story


Milestones

Wright Named NIDDK Hematology Research Program Director

Dr. Daniel G. Wright has been named senior scientific advisor and program director for hematology research at NIDDK.
Dr. Daniel G. Wright has been named senior scientific advisor and program director for hematology research at NIDDK.

Dr. Daniel G. Wright has been named senior scientific advisor and program director for hematology research in NIDDK’s extramural grants program. He succeeds David Badman, who built the hematology program to prominence over three decades, and will work closely with Dr. Terry Bishop, director of the institute’s hematology genomics and research training programs. Wright had been chief of hematology/oncology at Boston University Medical Center.

Wright’s move to NIH is a professional homecoming. He had been a clinical associate at NIAID and junior staff investigator at NCI in the 1970s, after receiving his M.D. and completing post-graduate training at Yale. He left NIH in 1980 for a post at Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, where he was chief of hematology for 12 years.

Wright says he looks forward to continuing the tradition of basic science as the core of NIDDK’s Hematology Program. He also looks forward to fostering translational research that will apply insights from basic science to clinical medicine. “What has made this program so important and valuable is its rich history of seminal basic research, particularly into hematopoietic stem cell biology, erythropoiesis and iron metabolism,” he said. “I hope this basic research focus continues to flourish. I also hope that novel research can be fostered that translates the results of this basic work into improved clinical care.”

Fundamentally, hematology is a multidisciplinary science, said Wright. Links between blood disorders, anemia in particular, and kidney and digestive diseases were recognized back when NIH—and the hematology research program at what is now NIDDK—was founded. Links between blood disorders and cancer, infections and cardiovascular diseases subsequently led to the growth of other hematology programs at NCI, NIAID and NHLBI, respectively.

Wright hopes to be a catalyst for increased collaboration among the diverse basic and clinical hematology research programs both within and outside of NIH. Holding both extramural and intramural positions (he is also an associate investigator in NIDDK’s Molecular Medicine Branch) may help him achieve this goal. “Overlapping interests in science are positive,” he noted. “Approaching similar questions from different points of view promotes advances in understanding health and disease.”

Wright has authored more than 140 basic and clinical research publications. He is a member of the American Society of Clinical Investigation and a member of the American Society of Hematology and American Society for Cell Biology.

NIDDK’s Li Killed in Accident

NIDDK’s Dr. Bo Li, a postdoctoral fellow in the molecular signaling section, Laboratory of Bioorganic Chemistry, died on Oct. 20 in a car accident near Pittsburgh.
NIDDK’s Dr. Bo Li, a postdoctoral fellow in the molecular signaling section, Laboratory of Bioorganic Chemistry, died on Oct. 20 in a car accident near Pittsburgh.

Dr. Bo Li, a postdoctoral fellow in the molecular signaling section, Laboratory of Bioorganic Chemistry, NIDDK, died on Oct. 20 in a car accident near Pittsburgh, while traveling to a scientific meeting in Detroit.

He was born in the Shan-Dong province of China in 1966 and earned a doctorate in cell biology from the University of Bern, Switzerland in 2002. Since 2003, he conducted postdoctoral research at the molecular signaling section.

During his stay at NIH, Li received the NIDDK Scientific Director’s Fellowship Award. He was also the author of many scientific papers on various aspects of cellular signaling, particularly the molecular mechanisms governing the function of G protein-coupled receptors.

Li will be remembered not only as a very dedicated and outstanding scientist but also as a wonderful colleague and loving husband and father. His primary drive was to provide a better future for his family. He is survived by his wife Lei Zhuang and his 10-year-old son Simon.

The Foundation for Advanced Education in the Sciences has established a memorial fund to support Li’s family. To donate, send a check payable to FAES (Attention: Bo Li Memorial Fund) to FAES, Bldg. 60, Suite 230, 1 Cloister Court, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20814-1460. For more information contact Dr. Yinghong Cui (Bldg. 8, Rm. B1-A05, 301-496-5736, email cuiy@mail.nih.gov).—

back to top of page