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NIH Record  
Vol. LIX, No. 14
  July 13, 2007
 Features
Forum on Neuroethics Breaks New Ground
‘Felix the Helix’ Introduces DNA to Elementary Students
Fogarty Celebrates Success of Disease Control Project
OER’s Smith Loses Weight, Reaps Big Rewards
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NIBIB Fifth Anniversary Celebrates Innovative Interdisciplinary Research
  NIBIB director Dr. Roderic Pettigrew presents the NIBIB Landmark Achievement Award to M. Joan Dawson, wife of the late Dr. Paul Lauterbur.
  NIBIB director Dr. Roderic Pettigrew presents the NIBIB Landmark Achievement Award to M. Joan Dawson, wife of the late Dr. Paul Lauterbur.
The last astronaut to walk on the moon, a former U.S. surgeon general and a Nobel Prize winner were among those who helped NIBIB celebrate its fifth anniversary May 31 and June 1. The scientific program, “Changing the World’s Health Care Through Biomedical Technologies” at Lister Hill Auditorium highlighted the critical role NIBIB plays in leading interdisciplinary research to develop innovative technologies that improve health care. The audience was welcomed and the day’s program was introduced by the current and first NIBIB director Dr. Roderic Pettigrew.The event began with a dinner the evening before the symposium. In opening remarks, former U.S. Surgeon General David Satcher said, “Integrating bioimaging and bioengineering will be critical to research in the future and to the new medical paradigm.” Indeed, “NIBIB is at the forefront of a lot of what we must do to face the changing medical paradigm,” which includes an aging population, increasing diversity and growing global interconnectedness, said Satcher.
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Up with Diversity
Talk on Evolution Sheds New Light On Darwinian Theory
  Dr. Joan Roughgarden takes issue with Darwin.
  Dr. Joan Roughgarden takes issue with Darwin.
Dr. Joan Roughgarden is so bold an evolutionary biologist, she’s willing to take on Charles Darwin. “I invite you to consider the possibility that the whole sexual selection theory should be junked, lock, stock and barrel,” she said about one of the famous naturalist’s tenets to an NIH audience recently. “And we should rethink sex, gender and sexuality from the ground up.”This idea may dismay some people, she conceded during her talk, part of a four-speaker lecture series on Evolution and Medicine sponsored by NIGMS. But she believes challenging the long-held theory can be viewed positively. “It means we are in a time when we can do some research that pertains to the foundational structure of evolutionary biology.”
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