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Vol. LIX, No. 14
July 13, 2007
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Fogarty Celebrates Success of Disease Control Project

  About to enjoy cake at the recent DCPP event were (from l) Dr. Karen Hofman, director, Division of Advanced Studies and Policy Analysis; DCPP senior editors Dr. Dean Jamison and Dr. Joel Breman; and Dr. Roger Glass, FIC director.  
  About to enjoy cake at the recent DCPP event were (from l) Dr. Karen Hofman, director, Division of Advanced Studies and Policy Analysis; DCPP senior editors Dr. Dean Jamison and Dr. Joel Breman; and Dr. Roger Glass, FIC director.  
Fogarty International Center director Dr. Roger Glass welcomed global health colleagues on June 11 to the first anniversary event, "The Disease Control Priorities Project: Implementing the Research Agenda," at the Natcher Center.

The purpose of the meeting was to review the key messages of the DCPP and highlight its impact on health policy and programs in developing countries. DCPP's two landmark publications-the second edition of Disease Control Priorities in Developing Countries (DCP2) and Global Burden of Disease and Risk Factors - have led to major advances in the health care system of many countries, including China, India and Mexico. These experiences were reviewed by Drs. Depei Liu, vice president, bureau of international cooperation, Chinese Academy of Engineering; Prabhat Jha, Canada research chair of health and development, University of Toronto; and Julio Frenk, senior fellow, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, and former minister of health, Mexico.

"This meeting was a great opportunity for FIC to enable the NIH community to learn about best buys in public health from key DCPP editors and authors. It was especially gratifying to hear how this work has already impacted major organizations and policymakers," said Dr. Karen Hofman, director, Division of Advanced Studies and Policy Analysis, FIC.

The event concluded with discussions on how to move the DCPP research agenda forward on non-communicable chronic diseases and to inform policymaking in developing countries using evidence-based analysis.  

More information about DCPP can be found at www.dcp2.org. NIH Record Icon

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