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Vol. LIX, No. 20
October 5, 2007
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NIH Expands CTSA Consortium

  Dr. Samuel Klein, professor of medicine, and Jennifer McCrea, research coordinator, offer health and nutri-tion tips to 10-year-old Van Carter at the Adams Elementary School (St. Louis) Wellness Fair. Klein will be director of the CTSA Clinical Interactions Resources Core at Washington University Institute of Clinical and Translational Sciences. (Photo courtesy Washington University)  
  Dr. Samuel Klein, professor of medicine, and Jennifer McCrea, research coordinator, offer health and nutri-tion tips to 10-year-old Van Carter at the Adams Elementary School (St. Louis) Wellness Fair. Klein will be director of the CTSA Clinical Interactions Resources Core at Washington University Institute of Clinical and Translational Sciences. (Photo courtesy Washington University)  
The Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) consortium, funded by NCRR, recently added 12 more academic health centers to the 12 announced last year. When fully implemented in 2012, 60 institutions will be linked together to energize the discipline of clinical and translational science.

"As the consortium grows, we are fulfilling our charge to transform clinical and translational research," said NIH director Dr. Elias Zerhouni.

The CTSA program funds diverse and far-reaching approaches to all aspects of the research enterprise. This round of awards includes: partnerships with three minority research centers; three institutions led by women principal investigators; and connections with an additional four national primate research centers, which will help bring discoveries in animal models more quickly into clinical practice. In addition, the newest members of the consortium bring together more than 60 organizations, including health care providers, nonprofit organizations and national laboratories.

"By expanding the consortium, we are better able to leverage expertise and resources across the CTSA institutions," said NCRR director Dr. Barbara Alving.

The CTSA initiative grew out of the NIH commitment to re-engineer the clinical research enterprise, one of the key objectives of the NIH Roadmap for Medical Research. Funding for it comes from redirecting existing clinical and translational programs and from Roadmap funds. Total funding for the new awards will be about $574 million.

While NCRR leads the effort, the CTSA program could not succeed without the cooperation of staff drawn from across the multiple institutes and centers, Alving noted. "It is in this way-through multiple partnerships, collaboration and connectivity-that CTSAs will transform clinical and translational research and apply new scientific advances to real world practice," she said.

A third funding opportunity announcement for CTSAs has been issued, calling for the next round of applications to be submitted by Nov. 7, with awards expected in June 2008.

For information on current members and new grantees, visit www.ctsaweb.org.NIH Record Icon

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