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Vol. LIX, No. 25
December 14, 2007
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Two at NIH Win Presidential Rank Award

Dr. Loré Anne McNicol
Dr. Richard Suzman

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Dr. Loré Anne McNicol

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Dr. Richard Suzman

Two NIH scientists have been honored with the 2007 Presidential Rank Award, which is given to a select group of career civil service executives whose integrity, strength, leadership and sustained performance have earned them one of the highest honors in government. NEI’s Dr. Loré Anne McNicol and NIA’s Dr. Richard Suzman won the Meritorious Rank Award, given for sustained accomplishment.

McNicol is director of NEI’s Division of Extramural Research (DER). She oversees the planning, implementation, coordination and evaluation of a $570 million research and training grant portfolio that supports more than 1,600 vision research projects. Since becoming DER director in 1999, McNicol has overseen the investment of significant amounts of new funding in high-impact research programs that have attracted investigators new to vision research. This resulted in creation of new NEI grant opportunities such as a pilot program for innovative research. As a result, grant applications have increased 25 percent.

McNicol also helped develop a major electronic grants administration tool now in wide use at NIH, served on the Bioengineering Research Consortium and coauthored a book on reparative medicine.

Suzman is director of NIA’s Behavioral and Social Research Program. “Dr. Suzman has been recognized with this award for his creativity, initiative and high standards of excellence in shaping and directing a behavioral and social science research program in the service of better understanding health and aging,” said NIA director Dr. Richard Hodes.

Suzman’s accomplishments include fostering new disciplines in the economics and demography of aging and interdisciplinary fields such as biodemography and neuroeconomics. In addition, he is known for recognizing and portraying the rapid growth of the age 85-plus population and has led international efforts to understand the causes, course and impacts of population aging.

Suzman, who joined NIA in 1985, also has been instrumental in building the federal statistical system regarding aging. Most notably, he conceived and has guided development of the Health and Retirement Study, an ongoing survey of more than 22,000 older Americans that began in 1992 and is now a model for aging research and data-sharing worldwide.

Earlier this year, he received the Robert J. Lapham Award from the Population Association of America. This biennial award recognizes individuals who have made distinguished contributions to population research, application of demographic knowledge to improve the human condition and service to the population-research profession. NIH Record Icon

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