skip navigation nih record
Vol. LXI, No. 3
February 6, 2009
cover

previous story

next story



NIH Hosts Fifth Women’s Health Research Symposium


Images from the fifth annual Interdisciplinary Women’s Health Research Symposium
The fifth annual Interdisciplinary Women’s Health Research Symposium, sponsored by ORWH in collaboration with NICHD, NIAMS, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality and the Food and Drug Administration, included lectures and a poster session.
NIH showcased new research in women’s health recently at the fifth annual Interdisciplinary Women’s Health Research Symposium.

Junior investigators funded under the Building Interdisciplinary Research Careers in Women’s Health (BIRCWH) program and senior investigators funded from the Specialized Centers of Research (SCOR) on Sex and Gender Factors Affecting Women’s Health presented results of their research in speeches and poster sessions. The research featured 15 key topics in the science of sex and gender, including perinatal depression, Cesarean delivery on request, the effect of gender on patient–physician interaction and urinary incontinence among women with diabetes.

“Interdisciplinary research and collaboration lead to new energies, fresh insights and synergy,” said Dr. Vivian Pinn, director of the Office of Research on Women’s Health.

BIRCWH supports research career development of junior faculty members who have recently completed clinical training or postdoctoral fellowships and who are beginning research in women’s health. SCOR has been successful in translating research from the laboratory to the clinical setting.

Symposium keynote speaker Dr. Stephen Katz, NIAMS director, discussed the value of translating science into improved patient care. He stressed the importance of interdisciplinary collaboration in the transfer of research to practice through strategic initiatives such as those under the NIH Roadmap.

“The public is ravenous for medical information,” he said, “but we also have to help those not [already] affected by particular diseases by determining who is susceptible…and translating that information into risk factors that can be communicated to the general public.”
Dr. Vivian Pinn (r), director of NIH’s Office of Research on Women’s Health, talks with participants.
At the event, junior investigators funded under the Building Interdisciplinary Research Careers in Women’s Health program and senior investigators funded from the Specialized Centers of Research on Sex and Gender Factors Affecting Women’s Health presented their findings. Dr. Vivian Pinn (r), director of NIH’s Office of Research on Women’s Health, talks with participants.

Other highlights from the symposium included Dr. Samantha Meltzer-Brody of the University of North Carolina who discussed her finding that women who present to their physician with perinatal depression often have symptoms more related to anxiety disorder, such as hypervigilance, anxiety, obsessing and feelings of dependency.

Dr. Diana Dow-Edwards of the University of Miami spoke on her findings that women sensitize to cocaine faster than men do. However, such sensitization was reduced by the administration of an anesthestic drug called isoflurane. On a related topic, Dr. Helen Fox of Yale University discussed her research that found progesterone may decrease the rewarding effects of cocaine in women.

The symposium was sponsored by ORWH in collaboration with NICHD, NIAMS, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality and the Food and Drug Administration. NIHRecord Icon

back to top of page