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NIH Record  
Vol. LXI, No. 6
  March 20, 2009
 Features
A Tongue for an Eye: Device Challenges Conventional Vision
Sapolsky Explores Stress from Uncommon Angle
NIAID Outreach Program Inspires Students
Stigma: Lessons, New Directions from Research
Rash of ‘Opportunity’ Thefts Solved
 Departments
Briefs
Digest
Milestones
Volunteers
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ARRA Results in Unprecedented Boost for NIH Budget
The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) signed by President Obama on Feb. 17 gives NIH a one-time 34 percent budget increase of $10.4 billion, a sum meant to stimulate both fine science and good jobs. The allotment, part of a $787 billion stimulus bill, must be disbursed within 2 years, sending NIH’s grant-making apparatus into high gear.

NIH had been invited to testify at a hearing last fall about a potential role for NIH in an economic stimulus package. NIH acting director Dr. Raynard Kington told Congress last November that investments in NIH science also create jobs. Two studies, one by the Rand Corp. and another by Families USA, had shown that an investment of $100,000 in biomedical research typically yielded $200,000 in benefits, including jobs. This so-called “multiplier effect” armed NIH with evidence that science investments create jobs, promote economic recovery and advance public health, simultaneously.
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Creative Model Offers Birdís-Eye View
New Biennial Report Hits the Streets
  The revamped Biennial Report of the Director, National Institutes of Health is available in print, via flash drive and online at http://report.nih.gov/biennialreport/. An earlier CD version was distributed to Congress last year.
  The revamped Biennial Report of the Director, National Institutes of Health is available in print, via flash drive and online at http://report.nih.gov/biennialreport/. An earlier CD version was distributed to Congress last year.

Dividends from the NIH Reform Act of 2006 keep coming. The latest is a 565-page Biennial Report of the Director, released in print earlier this year. Unlike prior documents that offered an institute-specific view of the agency’s work, the new report shows how the 27 institutes and centers, along with various other NIH components, work together across IC lines on the nation’s largest medical research enterprise.

“This is a new model for trans-NIH reporting,” says Anne Scanley, a program analyst in the Office of Science Policy and primary lead for producing the report.


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