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Vol. LXI, No. 14
July 10, 2009
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Milestones

Eight NIH’ers Named to AAM

Dr. Jack R. Bennink, chief, viral immunology section, Laboratory of Viral Diseases, NIAID. Dr. Edward A. Berger, chief, molecular structure section, Laboratory of Viral Diseases, NIAID. Dr. Deborah M. Hinton, chief, gene expression and regulation section, Laboratory of Molecular and Cellular Biology, NIDDK. Dr. Amar J.S. Klar, senior scientist, chief, developmental genetics section, Laboratory of Eucaryotic Gene Expression and Chromosome Biology, NCI-Frederick.

Dr. Jeffrey N. Strathern, deputy director, Center for Cancer Research; chief, Gene Regulation and Chromosome Biology Laboratory and head, genome recombination and regulation section, NCI-Frederick.

Dr. Jeffery K. Taubenberger, chief, viral pathogenesis and evolution section, Laboratory of Infectious Diseases, NIAID. Dr. Giorgio Trinchieri, director, Cancer and Inflammation Program, chief, Laboratory of Experimental Immunology, NCI Center for Cancer Research, and associate director for basic science, Trans-NIH Center for Human Immunology. Dr. Jonathan W. Yewdell, chief, cellular biology section, Laboratory of Viral Diseases, NIAID.
NIH’ers named to AAM include (top, from l) Dr. Jack R. Bennink, Dr. Edward A. Berger, Dr. Deborah M. Hinton, Dr. Amar J.S. Klar and (bottom, from l) Dr. Jeffrey N. Strathern, Dr. Jeffery K. Taubenberger, Dr. Giorgio Trinchieri and Dr. Jonathan W. Yewdell.

Eight NIH scientists—four from NIAID (three from its Laboratory of Viral Diseases)—are among 73 microbiologists recently elected to fellowship in the American Academy of Microbiology. Fellows of the academy are elected annually through a highly selective, peer-review process based on their records of scientific achievement and original contributions that have advanced microbiology. There are now over 2,000 fellows representing all subspecialties of microbiology including basic and applied research, teaching, public health, industry and government service. The new NIH fellows are:

Dr. Jack R. Bennink, chief, viral immunology section, Laboratory of Viral Diseases, NIAID.

Dr. Edward A. Berger, chief, molecular structure section, Laboratory of Viral Diseases, NIAID.

Dr. Deborah M. Hinton, chief, gene expression and regulation section, Laboratory of Molecular and Cellular Biology, NIDDK.

Dr. Amar J.S. Klar, senior scientist, chief, developmental genetics section, Laboratory of Eucaryotic Gene Expression and Chromosome Biology, NCI-Frederick.

Dr. Jeffrey N. Strathern, deputy director, Center for Cancer Research; chief, Gene Regulation and Chromosome Biology Laboratory and head, genome recombination and regulation section, NCI-Frederick.

Dr. Jeffery K. Taubenberger, chief, viral pathogenesis and evolution section, Laboratory of Infectious Diseases, NIAID.

Dr. Giorgio Trinchieri, director, Cancer and Inflammation Program, chief, Laboratory of Experimental Immunology, NCI Center for Cancer Research, and associate director for basic science, Trans-NIH Center for Human Immunology.

Dr. Jonathan W. Yewdell, chief, cellular biology section, Laboratory of Viral Diseases, NIAID.

NINR Welcomes Four Council Members

NINR director Dr. Patricia Grady (c) welcomes new council members (from l) Dr. Janet Williams, Dr. Barbara Guthrie, Dr. Kathleen Potempa and Dr. Gail Stuart.

NINR director Dr. Patricia Grady (c) welcomes new council members (from l) Dr. Janet Williams, Dr. Barbara Guthrie, Dr. Kathleen Potempa and Dr. Gail Stuart.

NINR director Dr. Patricia Grady recently welcomed four new members to the National Advisory Council for Nursing Research. They are:

Dr. Barbara J. Guthrie, associate dean for academic affairs at Yale University School of Nursing, a nationally recognized expert in culturally responsive health-related policies and programs. Her research has focused on health promotion and risk reduction programs for adolescent girls from diverse social and ethnic backgrounds.

Dr. Kathleen Potempa, dean of the University of Michigan School of Nursing, with 25 years of experience in nursing education, research and administration. She previously served on the HHS National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice and her research has focused on fatigue, exercise and cardiovascular fitness.

Dr. Gail Stuart, dean of the Medical University of South Carolina College of Nursing and a professor in the College of Medicine. A practitioner in the National Academies of Practice and chair of the board of the Annapolis Coalition on the Behavioral Health Workforce, her interests involve the study of depression and anxiety disorders as well as mental health delivery systems.

Dr. Janet Williams, Kelting professor of nursing at the University of Iowa College of Nursing and a past president of the International Society of Nurses in Genetics. Her research interests include the impact of genetic testing for Huntington’s disease and she is a frequent consultant on projects to promote the education and practice of genetics in nursing.


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