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Vol. LXI, No. 15
July 24, 2009
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Briefs

MyDelivery – Call for Beta Testers

MyDelivery, a prototype tool for communicating health and biomedical information developed by NLM’s research engineers, is released for beta testing. MyDelivery enables two individuals to exchange information in a highly secure and reliable way, even through potentially unreliable wireless networks, and overcomes limitations of attachment size and quantity often encountered in email. MyDelivery’s email-like user interface allows file attachments to be large in size (several gigabytes) or quantity (several thousand). Furthermore, its HIPAA-compliant end-to-end encryption and verification of data is accomplished through the invisible management of security certificates. This tool has potential applications in communication of patient health information, biomedical research, library document delivery, secure data exchange and telecommuting. Beta testers are invited to use it and provide feedback on its utility. The free registration and Windows client software are available at http://mydelivery. nlm.nih.gov.

FAES Class on Art Songs

The fall semester of FAES classes will include “Art Songs, a Guided Tour,” which will feature lectures and live performances. The course will explore European and American art songs from the classical period to the 20th century. The lectures are intended for music lovers of all kinds, whether they have formal music training, a little background or none at all. For more information call (301) 496-7976 or visit www.faes.org.

Principles of Clinical Pharmacology Course

The Principles of Clinical Pharmacology course, sponsored by the Clinical Center, will begin in Lipsett Amphitheater, Bldg. 10 on Sept. 3. The course will be held Thursday evenings from 6:30 to approximately 7:45 and will run through Apr. 22, 2010. Deadline for registration is Aug. 21.

The course covers topics such as pharmacokinetics, drug metabolism and transport, assessment of drug effects, drug therapy in special populations and drug discovery and development. An outstanding faculty has been assembled to present the lectures. The faculty has also prepared a textbook, Principles of Clinical Pharmacology, Second Edition, which will be available in the Foundation for Advanced Education in the Sciences, Inc. bookstore located in Bldg. 10. The textbook is also available from Amazon.com.

Registration is open to all interested persons free of charge unless the course is being taken for graduate credit through FAES. Certificates will be awarded at the end of the course to students who attend at least 75 percent of the lectures. More information about the course, including online registration, is available at www.cc.nih.gov/training/ training/principles.html or by calling (301) 435-6618.

Advances in Cancer Prevention Lecture, July 29
Dr. Olufunmilayo F. Olopade

The 10th annual Advances in Cancer Prevention Lecture will be given Wednesday, July 29 from 3 to 4 p.m. in Lister Hill Auditorium, Bldg. 38A. The talk, titled “Clinical Cancer Genetics and Prevention,” will be given by Dr. Olufunmilayo F. Olopade, professor of medicine and human genetics and director, Cancer Risk Clinic, at the University of Chicago.

Olopade is an internationally renowned leader in the field of clinical cancer genetics at the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine. Her research has focused on why women of African descent tend to get breast cancer earlier and with greater severity than their United States and European counterparts. Olopade has conceptualized groundbreaking discoveries about breast cancer through an interdisciplinary approach, leading to the development of treatment plans based on individual risk assessment for breast cancer patients on a case-by-case basis.

Olopade has received numerous honors and awards including a MacArthur fellowship “genius” award. Most recently she was inducted into the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences.

For more information, contact the Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program, (301) 496-8640. That is also the number to call if you require any reasonable accommodation to participate.

Free Outdoor Film Festival Aug. 14-21

The movie line-up has been announced for the 13th annual Comcast Film Festival that will take place nightly from Friday, Aug. 14 to Friday, Aug. 21. Come out to the grounds of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association & Strathmore and see movies viewed on the big screen. Bring your blanket, chairs (low chairs only) and anyone who loves movies to this event. The movies are free, food will be available to purchase on site and there will be a raffle (donations also accepted) to help raise funds for the NIH Charities (Friends of the Clinical Center, the Children’s Inn and Camp Fantastic/Special Love).

Friday, Aug. 14 The Curious Case of Benjamin Button

Saturday, Aug. 15 The Dark Knight

Sunday, Aug. 16 Kung Fu Panda

Monday, Aug. 17 Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull

Tuesday, Aug. 18 Singin’ In the Rain

Wednesday, Aug. 19 Twilight

Thursday, Aug. 20 Slumdog Millionaire

Friday, Aug. 21 Madagascar: Escape 2 Africa

Restaurants will open at 6:30 p.m. and the movies will begin at 8:30. For more info, visit www.filmfestnih.org or call (301) 496-6061. If you are interested in volunteering for this event, contact Kallie at wassermankt@ mail.nih.gov.

Yan Visits NIH Café, Eurest to Expand Nutrition Information
Celebrity chef Martin Yan presents a garnish demonstration at NIH. Chef Martin Yan also meets fans and signs one of his cookbooks.
Celebrity chef Martin Yan presents a garnish demonstration at NIH. At right, he also meets fans and signs one of his cookbooks.

Celebrity chef Martin Yan visited the NIH campus on June 1, presenting a garnish demonstration and signing his recent cookbook, Martin Yan Quick & Easy in Bldg. 10’s B1 café. The menu highlighted Yan’s “best of the best”—from his orange chicken to his kung pao beef. From the feedback received, diners’ favorite dish was the chicken. Customers were excited to meet Yan and waited patiently in line for him to sign copies of his cookbook.

Eurest Dining Services, in tandem with the Office of Research Services, is working to provide a better defined nutrition experience in the cafes. Building on the original Balanced Choices campaign, Eurest will provide additional meals at designated stations that meet the “sensible selection” criteria. A Sensible Selection meal is moderate in calories, fat, cholesterol and sodium. The meal has less than 600 calories, 30 percent or fewer calories from fat, 10 percent or fewer calories from saturated fat, 80 mg or less cholesterol and 600 mg or less sodium. The meals will be highlighted with a Sensible Selection icon and will be available for breakfast and lunch.

To satisfy requests for nutrition information, Eurest is now providing on the ORS web site nutrition data ranging from the salad bar to Au Bon Pain offerings. Visit http://does.ors.od.nih.gov/food/nutrition.htm for more information.

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