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Vol. LXI, No. 17
August 21, 2009
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Adventure in Science Plans 17th Season at NIH

Adventure in Science participants (from l) Meera Basavappa, Victoria MacConnell and Andrew Fullerton carry out an exercise demonstrating how combinations of gene alleles create unique individuals.
Adventure in Science participants (from l) Meera Basavappa, Victoria MacConnell and Andrew Fullerton carry out an exercise demonstrating how combinations of gene alleles create unique individuals.

Adventure in Science, a non-profit science education program for children, is planning its 17th year at NIH. The program, which meets on Saturday mornings October through March in Bldg. 10, is designed to show 8- to 11-year-olds the fun of science using hands-on activities, from building (and launching) model rockets to dissecting frogs. The teachers are mostly volunteer NIH staff, from postdocs to institute directors. A similar program for children ages 12-15 is available at the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Gaithersburg.

If you are interested in volunteering to teach in the program, contact Peter Kellman (301- 496-2513, kellmanp@nhlbi.nih.gov) or Ed Max (301-827-1806, edward.max@fda.hhs.gov). If you would like to enroll your child, you can request forms from the 4H office at Montgomery County Cooperative Extension, (301) 590-9638. When enrollment is full, applications are accepted for a waiting list.

Aaron Feigenbaum peers at live pond organisms under a microscope. Veronica Orellana (l) and Revathy Pillai experience a live, crawling millipede literally “hands-on.”

Above left, Aaron Feigenbaum peers at live pond organisms under a microscope. At right, Veronica Orellana (l) and Revathy Pillai experience a live, crawling millipede literally “hands-on.” Below left, Nick Mole begins a journey to explore the inside of a frog. Below right, Justina Yang (l) and Tarun Shah observe the electrical output of a potato.

Nick Mole begins a journey to explore the inside of a frog. Justina Yang (l) and Tarun Shah observe the electrical output of a potato.

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