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Vol. LXI, No. 20
October 2, 2009
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Lipkin To Give 2009 Kinyoun Lecture

Dr. Ian Lipkin

Dr. Ian Lipkin, a world expert known for rapidly discovering the agents of emerging infectious diseases, will deliver the annual NIAID Kinyoun Lecture on Thursday, Oct. 8 at 2 p.m. in Masur Auditorium, Bldg. 10. Lipkin is director of the Center for Infection and Immunity and John Snow professor of epidemiology at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health.

In his talk, “Microbe Hunting in the 21st Century,” Lipkin will provide a staged strategy for using analytic tools in disease investigation and detection. He will detail the strengths and limitations of these tools and illustrate how he uses them in novel ways to solve clinical problems.

The diagnostic methods Lipkin has developed, including MassTag-PCR, the GreeneChip diagnostic and high-throughput sequencing, have revolutionized microbiology by providing rapid, sensitive tools for surveillance and diagnosis of diseases. Using these techniques in his own laboratory, he has revealed the links between infectious and chronic diseases and advanced the discovery, understanding and management of emerging diseases such as West Nile virus infection, SARS and LuJo virus—a new virus identified in a hemorrhagic fever outbreak in Zambia and South Africa in 2008.

Lipkin directs the Northeast Biodefense Center, one of eleven NIAID Regional Centers of Excellence for Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases. In this position, he oversees a consortium of 28 academic and government institutions that integrate medical research with technology to detect and counter the effects of emerging or reemerging infectious diseases.

The Kinyoun Lecture, which honors Dr. Joseph Kinyoun, highlights advances in immunology and infectious disease research. NIH traces its roots to the Laboratory of Hygiene, which Kinyoun established in 1887 on Staten Island, to find new ways to screen for infectious diseases. NIHRecord Icon

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