skip navigation
NIH Record  
Vol. LXI, No. 23
  November 13, 2009
 Features
Full-Time NIH’er Thrives as Part-Time Scuba Instructor to Soldiers
Visiting Pianist Offers Healing Music at The Clinical Research Center
Book Recounts History of the Eye Institute
Trans-NIH Global Health Research Effort Launched
NIAID’s Inaugural Bioinformatics Festival Deemed a Success
Annual Campaign Off to Great Start
Darwin Symposium Explores Naturalist And His Works
NIH Library Open House Draws Crowd
CIT Computer Training Updates Web Page, Courses
NIH Hosts Community College Day
Grady Emphasizes Research, Practice Link
 Departments
Briefs
Milestones
printer friendly version
NIH Celebrates ARRA Milestone
  NIH’ers breathe a sigh of relief at the ARRA appreciation event on Oct. 15.
  NIH’ers breathe a sigh of relief at the ARRA appreciation event on Oct. 15.
It’s hard to imagine that earlier in the year, no one had heard of the term ARRA because it hadn’t been coined yet.

Now there are NIH’ers who could probably discuss the specifics of the funding legislation in their sleep. Staffers postponed or canceled summer vacations, answered their Blackberries at all hours and worked in high gear in order to push out the first $5 billion of the $10.4 billion funding package before the end of this year’s fiscal calendar on Sept. 30.
more…


Getting a Fuller Picture
Genetics Offers Promise of Personalized Medicine
  Dr. Santa Tumminia (l) of NEI and Dr. Anna Barker of NCI are both using genomic information to develop patient-specific therapies, a major goal of modern medicine.
  Dr. Santa Tumminia (l) of NEI and Dr. Anna Barker of NCI are both using genomic information to develop patient-specific therapies, a major goal of modern medicine.
Genetics is not a new field, but for many researchers, the possibilities for study presented by unraveling genetic sequences, sequence variants and their potential relationship to specific illnesses are ever-changing. For as far into the future as anyone can project, scientists will have plenty to study, courtesy of the intricacies of the human genome.

One of the most beneficial aspects of having the human genome mapped, investigators contend, is that it offers a picture of what “normal” is supposed to look like. However, any scientist knows that “normal” is a relative and transient term. We have millions of interactions and lesser mutations occurring in our bodies at any given time. It’s the genetic alterations that aren’t minor or self-corrected that can cause problems and result in disease, experts note.
more…