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NIH Record  
Vol. LXI, No. 25
  December 11, 2009
 Features
Suarez, Molina Speak on Hispanics, Health, Hope
Yoga Is Researcher’s Lab Assistant
Frenk To Deliver 2009 Barmes Global Health Lecture
Research Radio Podcast Reaches 100th Episode
‘Health’s Angels’ Club Is Back Up And Running
Pimentel Speaks on Disability, Activism, Attitudes
Transhare Subsidy Rises, NIH Expert Cox Wins Award
Historian Tomes Tracks History of Consumer Health Info
Depression, Links to Other Disorders Discussed
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Deciphering the Genetic Code
Symposium Recounts Nobel Laureate Nirenberg’s Triumphal Studies
  Dr. Marshall Nirenberg (r) and NIH deputy director for intramural research Dr. Michael Gottesman flank the plaque designating NIH as a National Historic Chemical Landmark.
  Dr. Marshall Nirenberg (r) and NIH deputy director for intramural research Dr. Michael Gottesman flank the plaque designating NIH as a National Historic Chemical Landmark.

The official occasion was the American Chemical Society’s designation of Dr. Marshall Nirenberg’s Nobel Prize-winning achievement of cracking the genetic code as a National Historic Chemical Landmark. But the day-long symposium held in Nirenberg’s honor Nov. 12 in Masur Auditorium was more a warm recognition by many colleagues that science’s top prize could not have gone to a nicer guy, or to one whose work opened any wider the floodgates of downstream scientific consequence.

Perhaps the highest encomium in a day filled with them was offered by another Nobel laureate, Dr. Philip A. Sharp of MIT, who with genuine emotion wondered “how exciting it must have been [for Nirenberg] to stand there and know that you have cracked the code, and that there’s only one code, and it will be the code universal for all of time…I envy Marshall being able to stand up there and give that talk…it must have been a tremendous day.” Like many others, Sharp also observed that Nirenberg “is a remarkably encouraging and friendly person.”
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Guttmacher to NICHD
Green Named NHGRI Director

NIH director Dr. Francis Collins has named Dr. Eric D. Green as the new leader of the National Human Genome Research Institute. For the past 7 years, Green has been NHGRI’s scientific director.

“Dr. Green is the perfect choice to be NHGRI director,” said Collins. “He grew up professionally with the genome era and has been on the cutting edge of genomics research for more than two decades. As NHGRI scientific director, Dr. Green has overseen spectacular growth and diversification of the institute’s intramural research program.”

Collins led NHGRI from April 1993 until August 2008. This is the first time an institute director has risen to lead the entire NIH and picked his own successor.

Upon Collins’s departure, Dr. Alan E. Gutt-macher, former NHGRI deputy director, stepped in to serve as NHGRI’s acting director. Guttmacher was recently named acting director of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. Until replacements are chosen, Green will serve as NHGRI’s acting deputy director and acting scientific director in addition to his duties as NHGRI director.
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