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NIH Record  
Vol. LXII, No. 4
  February 19, 2010
 Features
NHLBI Program Fosters Advocacy Training Opportunities
Nobel Laureate To Give NEI’s Sayer Lecture, Mar. 10 in Masur
Fogarty Presents Global Health Guru Rosling, Feb. 22
 Departments
Briefs
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‘Rules in Science’
Stem Cell Innovator Yamanaka Shares Secrets of Success
  Dr. Shinya Yamanaka spoke at NIH on Jan. 14.
  Dr. Shinya Yamanaka spoke at NIH on Jan. 14.
Not too long ago, a mild-mannered scientist from Japan was tending his own lab animal cages. He had no lab techs and no funds to hire any. Next thing he knew, he was becoming famous worldwide for a stem cell breakthrough so stunning the research community is still gasping. At least that’s the way Dr. Shinya Yamanaka, director of the Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, told his story Jan. 14 to an SRO crowd in Masur Auditorium. Of course, he shared the groundbreaking technique for making all-purpose stem cells without using embryos. But more, he gave the audience a rare and humorous glimpse into the sometimes hard-knock life of a fledgling bench scientist. And he offered every hardworking but frequently frustrated postdoc a reason to stick with research as a career.
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Knitter Power
Rosenberg Launches Cap Campaign to Save Newborns
  NIAID’s Alice Rosenberg coordinates a volunteer project to save infants from hypothermia.
  NIAID’s Alice Rosenberg coordinates a volunteer project to save infants from hypothermia.

A baby’s first cry is a sound like none other. We know that infants must learn to breathe on their own, and fast. And they must also survive being pushed from the perfection of their mothers’ warmth.

To be expelled, soaking wet, not wearing a stitch, suddenly exposed to room temperature, or worse—what a shock.

Here’s the problem: The newborn brain is too immature to maintain body temperature. Even a healthy, full-term infant has few defenses against cold stress.

That’s why delivery room nurses slip stockinette caps onto newborn heads. The scalp has a relatively large surface area from which heat can be lost and if an infant’s temperature dips too low for too long, cold injury can trigger a chain reaction that ends in death.

“Understand that people live in a world where a baby can die of cold,” says NIAID’s Alice Rosenberg. “In Rwanda, a man walked for 3 days with his pregnant wife in a wheelbarrow to bring her to a clinic only to have the baby die of hypothermia.”
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