skip navigation nih record
Vol. LXII, No. 7
April 2, 2010
cover

previous story

next story


Milestones

Collins Receives Albany Medical Center Prize

NIH director Dr. Francis Collins was recently named a co-winner of the Albany Medical Center Prize in Medicine and Biomedical Research for his leading role in mapping the human genome. While accepting the honor, Collins declined his portion of the $500,000 prize in order to comply with government ethics rules. He shares the award with Dr. Eric Lander, director of the Broad Institute at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University, and Dr. David Botstein, director of the Lewis-Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics at Princeton University. They will be recognized during an Apr. 23 celebration at Albany Medical Center in Albany, N.Y.

“These three scientists undoubtedly will hold a special place in the history of science and medicine as primary initiators of a profound revolution in human development,” said Dr. James Barba, president and chief executive officer of Albany Medical Center. “This is because they unlocked and opened the door that had previously barred us from understanding disease processes at the most basic genetic level.”

“The Human Genome Project has made it possible for us to identify genetic causes of illness in a fraction of the time it used to take,” Collins said. “This was truly a collaborative, international effort involving more than 2,000 scientists in 6 countries, working together to make that first human sequence possible. It is important to note that the Human Genome Project gave away all the data immediately. That kind of free and rapid data release has now become the standard for many other large-scale collaborative projects, speeding up the application of these discoveries to clinical medicine.”

This is the 10th year the Albany Medical Center Prize, known as “America’s Nobel,” has been awarded and the second time an NIH winner has been named. NIAID director Dr. Anthony Fauci won the honor in 2002.


Dr. Rashmi Gopal-Srivastava (l) presents award to Dr. Yun-Bo Shi. Dr. Emily Chew accepts her award
APAO president Dr. Rashmi Gopal-Srivastava (l) presents award to Dr. Yun-Bo Shi. At right, Dr. Emily Chew accepts her award.

APAO Presents Awards, Announces Board

The NIH Asian and Pacific Islander Organization (APAO) recently honored two NIH researchers for their outstanding scientific achievements at its annual awards ceremony.

Dr. Yun-Bo Shi, chief, section on molecular morphogenesis, NICHD, was recognized for outstanding contributions and accomplishments in the field of nuclear receptors and endocrine research. Dr. Emily Chew, deputy director, Division of Epidemiology and Clinical Research, NEI, was honored for outstanding contributions and accomplishments in the field of age-related eye disease and early treatment of diabetic retinopathy.

The NIH APAO also recently announced its 2010 board: Dr. Rashmi Gopal-Srivastava, Office of Rare Diseases Research, president; Franda Liu, NLM, vice president; Aaron Bell, NCI, treasurer; and Phyllis Chui, NLM, executive secretary.

For more information on APAO, its mission and meetings, visit www.recgov.org/r&w/apao.

 

Valenzuela Honored for Work in Tropical Medicine

Dr. Jesus G. Valenzuela
Dr. Jesus G. Valenzuela, chief of the vector molecular biology unit in the Laboratory of Malaria and Vector Research, NIAID, won the 2009 Bailey K. Ashford Medal for distinguished work in tropical medicine by an early or mid-career scientist. The medal was presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. Valenzuela’s lab studies proteins found in the saliva of sand flies and how immunity to these proteins can protect against leishmaniasis, a parasitic disease transmitted to animals and humans by these insects. He joined NIAID in 1996 after earning his Ph.D. in biochemistry from the University of Arizona at Tucson.




Murphy Named Outstanding Mentor

Dr. Philip M. Murphy

NIAID recently presented its annual Outstanding Mentor Award to Dr. Philip M. Murphy, chief of the molecular signaling section in the Laboratory of Molecular Immunology. The award acknowledges exemplary mentoring and guidance to NIAID’s trainees. This is the second year the award has been made. Murphy leads a program of research on G protein-coupled receptors of the immune system. He has trained numerous students from both the United States and abroad.


Myrick Certified by Brookings Institution

Dr. Dorkina Myrick (r), a medical officer in extramural training and career development at NCI’s Center for Cancer Training, recently received a certificate in public leadership from the Brookings Institution in Washington, D.C. Dr. Strobe Talbott (l), Brookings president, presented the plaque.

Dr. Dorkina Myrick (r), a medical officer in extramural training and career development at NCI’s Center for Cancer Training, recently received a certificate in public leadership from the Brookings Institution in Washington, D.C. Dr. Strobe Talbott (l), Brookings president, presented the plaque. The certificate program is a 20-day curriculum for government employees at the GS 13-15 and SES levels. As part of her program of study, Myrick spent a week on Capitol Hill interacting with legislators, policymakers and journalists. She is a former clinical fellow and graduate of the NIH/NCI anatomic pathology training program and a former recipient of an NIH National Research Service Award.

back to top of page