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Vol. LXII, No. 8
April 16, 2010
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Briefs

STEP Forum on Early Influences on Health

The staff training in extramural programs (STEP) committee will present a Science for All forum on the topic “Blast from the Past: Early Influences on Long-Term Health” on Thursday, Apr. 29, from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in Natcher Bldg., Rms. E1/E2.

Did your grandmother’s diet influence your health? What is epigenetics and how does it influence disease risk? How much should public health interventions be aimed at the developmental period? The “developmental origins” hypothesis proposes that influences in early life can affect long-term health. Now, well-described epigenetic modifications of gene expression may provide a basis for understanding these phenomena. This forum will investigate the science behind this hypothesis.

NIH 2010 National Day of Prayer

This year’s NIH National Day of Prayer will be held Thursday, May 6 from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. in front of Bldg. 1. Come out and join fellow NIH’ers, patients and friends to celebrate a day Congress has set aside for our country. Federal and military compounds all over the U.S. will have their National Day of Prayer program on this same day with guest speakers, music and prayer. Bring your friends and family. All are welcome.

Travel Show Scheduled for Apr. 29

Visit with vendors from amusement parks, hotels, car rental companies and more at the R&W Travel Show on Thursday, Apr. 29 from 10 a.m to 2 p.m. on Bldg. 31A’s patio. Enter drawings for a chance to win tons of prizes. Chick-Fil-A will have lunch for sale. For more information, call the NIH Recreation & Welfare Association, (301) 496-6061.

PubMed Extends Its Reach Backward, To Go Forward

Harry Truman was President, gasoline cost 15 cents a gallon, the transistor was invented and internationally renowned surgeon Dr. Michael DeBakey was publishing articles on the U.S. Army’s World War II experience with battle injuries, military surgery and the use of streptomycin therapy. Citations to these and more than 60,000 other articles indexed in the 1947 Current List of Medical Literature are now available in the National Library of Medicine’s MEDLINE/PubMed database (www.pubmed.gov).

When the original MEDLINE database made its debut in 1971, it contained citations to journal articles mostly published from approximately 1966 forward. NLM began to expand the retrospective coverage of the database in 1996, when more than 307,000 citations originally published in the 1964 and 1965 Cumulated Index Medicus were made available as OLDMEDLINE. The library has been moving steadily backward in time ever since.

Although 1947 may seem far back in the rear view mirror of history, important articles in biomedicine appeared that year and they may hold vital lessons for research in the 21st century.

“Some contemporary medical questions can only be answered by consulting the older literature,” observed NLM director Dr. Donald Lindberg. “NLM is working to make the journal citations in older printed indexes electronically searchable and our goal is to go back at least as far as World War II.”

With the addition of the 1947 citations, MEDLINE/PubMed subset now contains over 20 million citations produced during 63 years of indexing the biomedical literature.


So, Have You Cured Bird Flu Yet?
Just as predicted, the family of Canada geese that used the front of Bldg. 5 for a home last year appears to have returned, and is again in family-building mode. On Mar. 29, NIDDK’s Ying F. Huang took this photo of a curious goose peering in at the doings in Bldg. 5. The animal’s behavior brings to mind the words of The Meters’ song, They All Asked for You: “I went on up to the Audubon Zoo and they all asked for you…they even inquired about you.”
Just as predicted, the family of Canada geese that used the front of Bldg. 5 for a home last year appears to have returned, and is again in family-building mode. On Mar. 29, NIDDK’s Ying F. Huang took this photo of a curious goose peering in at the doings in Bldg. 5. The animal’s behavior brings to mind the words of The Meters’ song, They All Asked for You: “I went on up to the Audubon Zoo and they all asked for you…they even inquired about you.”

Conference To Explore the Science of Community Engagement

The National Center for Research Resources’ Clinical and Translational Science Awards Consortium will conduct its third annual conference on community engagement May 13-14 at the Sheraton National Hotel in Arlington, Va.

“Partnering to Improve Health: The Science of Community Engagement” will emphasize the scientific rigor of community engagement and how to identify and secure local and regional resources. Participants will discuss ways to build effective collaborations with community partners to increase clinical research study participation and improve health outcomes, along with methods, models and outcomes that demonstrate measurable health improvements. The event also will feature a poster session.

To attend the conference, register by May 10 at www.aptrweb.org/prof_dev/ce_registration.html.

For more information, visit www.aptrweb.org/prof_dev/ce_workshop.html or contact Donna Jo McCloskey at mccloskd@mail.nih.gov or (301) 451-4216.

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