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Vol. LXII, No. 12
June 11, 2010
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Milestones

NCI’s Wiltrout Named ‘Lab Director of the Year’

Dr. Robert H. Wiltrout

Dr. Robert H. Wiltrout, director of the Center for Cancer Research, NCI, became the first NIH scientific director to receive the Federal Laboratory Consortium for Technology Transfer’s Director of the Year Award on Apr. 29 in Albuquerque. This national award is presented annually to laboratory directors who have made outstanding contributions supporting technology transfer activities at their federal laboratory and recognizes the excellence of the recipient’s efforts and the achievements of their technology transfer program.

Wiltrout views the many CCR/NCI technology transfer successes as a team effort driven by the ingenuity, perseverance and commitment of the center’s researchers and their network of collaborators in government, industry and academia. All of these collaborators work closely with NIH’s technology transfer professionals to accelerate research progress against cancer and HIV/AIDS. During Wiltrout’s tenure, CCR has made significant advances in building strong scientific partnerships with public and private institutions and strives to continue to bring new scientific discoveries to the marketplace.

Under his direction, CCR has continued to see substantial technology transfer achievements including: 275 active clinical trials, 137 active Cooperative Research and Development Agreements with industry and annually more than 1,000 research material transfers to collaborators worldwide. Last year, there were 100 new employee invention reports filed, 41 patents issued and 94 new commercial licenses granted. Currently, the center’s technologies can be found in more than 200 licensed products.

NIEHS’s Rogan Chosen to Head AES

Dr. Walter Rogan

The American Epidemiological Society recently announced the election of NIEHS epidemiologist Dr. Walter Rogan as its next president. He was elected during the 83rd annual meeting of AES in Baltimore.

Rogan is a principal investigator who heads the NIEHS pediatric epidemiology group. His current work includes the Study of Estrogen Activity and Development and the Infant Feeding and Early Development study.

The AES was established in 1927 by scientists affiliated with the Center for Disease Control and the Epidemic Intelligence Service to provide a scientific forum for senior epidemiologists. Early members were leading experts in infectious disease epidemiology and vaccine trials.

Since then, like the field of epidemiology itself, the organization has broadened its scope to include epidemiologists like Rogan—a member since 1990—whose focus is on chronic diseases, genetics, environment, biostatistics and other concerns beyond the scope of infectious disease and vaccination. Rogan is one of five scientists in the NIEHS Epidemiology Branch and Biostatistics Branch who are members of AES.

Five Appointed to NIAMS Council

NIAMS director Dr. Stephen Katz (front, r) and deputy director Dr. Robert Carter (back row, l) welcome new members to the institute’s council. They include (back row, from l) Jean Pickford, Dr. Julio Vergara and Dr. Regis O’Keefe. Joining Katz in the front row is Bradley Stephenson. (Not pictured: Dr. Harry Dietz)
NIAMS director Dr. Stephen Katz (front, r) and deputy director Dr. Robert Carter (back row, l) welcome new members to the institute’s council. They include (back row, from l) Jean Pickford, Dr. Julio Vergara and Dr. Regis O’Keefe. Joining Katz in the front row is Bradley Stephenson. (Not pictured: Dr. Harry Dietz)

Five new members were recently named to the National Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Advisory Council.

Dr. Harry C. Dietz is the Victor A. McKusick professor of medicine and genetics at the Institute of Genetic Medicine at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, director of the Marfan Syndrome Clinic at Johns Hopkins and a professor in the pediatrics and neurosurgery departments at Hopkins. He is a member of numerous professional associations including the American Society of Human Genetics, Society for Pediatric Research and the American Society for Clinical Investigation.

Dr. Regis J. O’Keefe is chair of the department of orthopaedics and rehabilitation at the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry and director of the Center for Musculoskeletal Research at the University of Rochester Medical Center. He is a national leader in the field of orthopaedic oncology, past president of the U.S. Bone and Joint Decade and is a member of several national organizations including the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

Jean Pickford is executive director of the Foundation for Ichthyosis and Related Skin Types, Inc. (F.I.R.S.T.), which represents individuals and families affected by a set of rare genetic skin diseases. Before directing F.I.R.S.T., she worked for the National Tay-Sachs and Allied Diseases Association of the Delaware Valley and for the American Heart Association’s chapter in southeastern Pennsylvania.

Bradley R. Stephenson, an attorney, is an advocate for muscular dystrophy patients and has served on the muscular dystrophy coordinating committee at NIH since 2003. He is also founder of a web site dedicated to Becker Muscular Dystrophy and serves on the advisory board of Texans for the Advancement of Medical Research.

Dr. Julio L. Vergara is distinguished professor of physiology in the department of physiology at the University of California, Los Angeles David Geffen School of Medicine. He is a renowned expert in the field of muscle physiology and a national leader in training physiology researchers and physician-scientists.

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