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NIH Record  
Vol. LXIII, No. 10
  May 13, 2011
 Features
Bio-Trac Program Keeps Scientists, Students on Right Track
Regard for Hill Informs Memorial Lecture
Fauci To Reflect on 30 Years of HIV/AIDS
New Plan for Obesity Research Seeks to Curb Epidemic
Solowey Awardee Barres To Lecture, May 25 in Lipsett Amphitheater
NIH Helps Stricken Chile, Haiti with Equipment Loans
May Is Healthy Vision Month
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Recreating the Heyday
New NIH-Lasker Collaboration Boosts Clinical Research
At a symposium for the new NIH-Lasker clinical scholars program, Dr. Marston Linehan discusses his research on kidney cancer.
At a symposium for the new NIH-Lasker clinical scholars program, Dr. Marston Linehan discusses his research on kidney cancer.

Dr. Marston Linehan gets animated talking about kidney cancer. You can see his passion for his work in every gesture. Nearly three decades into his NIH career, he gets emotional when he describes the people he’s treated—especially the ones who didn’t survive.

“This is the first person I saw with this,” he said, showing a slide at a recent symposium. “An 18-year-old female from Charlottesville. She had a 10-centimeter kidney tumor, which I removed. She died 9 months later, of invasive disease. Her mother also died [with the same cancer] after about 14 months. It took us 18 years to figure out what they were suffering from.”

The symposium marked the launch of the new NIH-Lasker Clinical Research Scholars Program. The program has high ambition: Recreate NIH’s heyday of clinical research.
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Primate Scientist Goodall Reflects on Her Career, Activism

Primate researcher Dr. Jane Goodall greeted the audience in Masur Auditorium by cheerfully imitating the sound a chimpanzee makes on a typical morning in Gombe, Tanzania. It was in Gombe 50 years ago that she began the research program that would later blossom into the Jane Goodall Institute. Over the next hour, Goodall shared the story of how she came to study chimpanzees in Africa and eventually became an activist on their behalf.

NIH director Dr. Francis Collins introduced Goodall at the special event on Apr. 11, remarking on her three dozen honorary degrees, almost 100 awards and 1986 landmark book The Chimpanzees of Gombe: Patterns of Behavior. “Tarzan and Dr. Dolittle were her favorite books,” said Collins, speaking of Goodall as a young girl. “She knew she’d be a much better jungle companion for Tarzan than that other Jane. And she was right.”
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