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Vol. LXIII, No. 18
September 2, 2011
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Savor the Pioneer Award Symposium, Sept. 20-21

On Sept. 20-21, hear some of the most innovative scientists in the country present their work at the seventh annual NIH Director’s Pioneer Award Symposium. The meeting will highlight bold, inventive approaches to some of today’s most important challenges and questions in biomedical and behavioral research.

Here are five reasons to attend this special event:

Exciting Atmosphere. Part of the NIH Common Fund’s High Risk Research program (http://commonfund.nih.gov/highrisk/index.aspx), the Pioneer Award supports scientists doing research that is high-risk but potentially transformative. The meeting will kick off with the announcement of the 2011 Pioneer Award recipients.

Scientific Mosaic. The symposium offers a broad range of science in a compact timeframe. Thematically grouped platform presentations by the 2006 “graduating class” of Pioneer Award recipients, who are completing their 5-year grants, will highlight topics from the microbiome to suspended animation. Selected recipients of the NIH Director’s New Innovator Award, which goes to highly innovative scientists in early stages of their careers, will also give talks.

Contacts and Conversations. Poster sessions with receptions plus breaks provide ample opportunities for dialogue and networking with the more than 150 award recipients.

It’s Nearby. The gathering will be held near campus at the Doubletree Bethesda Hotel & Executive Meeting Center, 8120 Wisconsin Ave.

It’s Easy. Attendance is free, open to all and registration is not required. Come for the whole event or drop in just for the sessions that especially interest you. The agenda, with links to research summaries and publications, is available at http://commonfund.nih.gov/pioneer/Symposium2011. Platform presentations will also be videotaped and available for later viewing at http://videocast.nih.gov.

For reasonable accommodation or more information, call Shan McCollough at (301) 594-3555 or email pioneer@nih.gov. NIHRecord Icon


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