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Vol. LXV, No. 9
April 26, 2013
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Briefs

STEP Forum on Coexisting Diseases, May 9

The staff training in extramural programs (STEP) committee will present a Current Controversies in Medicine forum on the topic “Coexisting Diseases: How To Live with a Triple Whammy,” on Thursday, May 9, from 9 a.m. to noon in Lister Hill Auditorium, Bldg. 38A.

We are now living longer, but often with multiple chronic co-morbidities that confound effective diagnosis and treatment. The challenge is to develop optimal therapeutic approaches to help the patient as a whole, rather than managing individual diseases. Learn about recent efforts in prevention, diagnosis and management of co-existing medical conditions that are changing the way doctors think about and treat their patients.

Bike to Work Day, May 17

Celebrate National Bike Month and Bike to Work Day with the NIH Bicycle Commuter Club, Friday, May 17, from 7 to 9:30 a.m. on the Paul Rogers Plaza in front of Bldg. 1 and off-campus at Rockledge and Rockville, near the new NCI Shady Grove building. The off-campus pit stops run from 6:30 to 8:30 a.m.

At the Bldg. 1 stop, those who show up riding a bicycle and wearing a helmet may enjoy snacks and participate in a raffle including such prizes as cycling gear and equipment and Fitness Center memberships. All pre-registrants get a free Bike to Work Day T-shirt.

Bike to Work Day takes place rain or shine. If you would like to volunteer to help at the event, email Jonathan Mazal (mazaljr@mail.nih.gov).

NIH 2013 National Day of Prayer, May 2

This year’s NIH National Day of Prayer will be held Thursday, May 2 from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. in front of Bldg. 1. Join fellow NIH’ers, patients and friends in celebration of a day Congress has set aside for our country. Federal and military compounds all over the U.S. will observe the National Day of Prayer on this day with guest speakers, music and prayer. All are welcome.

OITE Hosts Career Symposium, May 14

The NIH Office of Intramural Training & Education invites all NIH graduate students and postdoctoral trainees, both basic scientists and clinicians, to participate in the 6th NIH Career Symposium on Tuesday, May 14 at Natcher Conference Center from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Attendees can learn about scientific career options and explore factors that lead to career success. The keynote speaker will be Dr. Alan Leshner, chief executive officer of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. For details visit www.training.nih.gov.

‘Genetics Home Reference’ Celebrates 10 Years

George W. Bush was President, gas cost $1.59 a gallon and the Human Genome Project, coincidentally, had officially ended on Apr. 25, 2003, the date that NLM launched Genetics Home Reference (GHR), a free online resource about human genetics created for patients, families and the public (http://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/). The web site provides a bridge between the public’s questions about human genetics and the rich technical data that has emerged from the Human Genome Project and other genomic research.

GHR provides consumer-friendly summaries of genetic conditions and their associated genes, gene families and chromosomes

GHR provides consumer-friendly summaries of genetic conditions and their associated genes, gene families and chromosomes. The site also features a primer called “Help Me Understand Genetics,” an illustrated introduction to fundamental topics in human genetics including mutations, inheritance, genetic testing, gene therapy and genomic research. Additionally, GHR offers helpful background information, including a glossary of genetic and medical terms and links to numerous other quality resources. A “Spotlight” feature on the GHR home page highlights important observances and discoveries in the field of human genetics and draws attention to useful learning tools and clinical resources.

When it was launched a decade ago, Genetics Home Reference featured 19 condition summaries and 16 gene descriptions. Today, GHR offers easy-to-read summaries of about 850 genetic conditions, more than 1,060 genes, more than 80 gene families, all of the human chromosomes and mitochondrial DNA. New summaries are added regularly. GHR currently receives about 43,000 visitors per day and 39 million hits per month, suggesting that it continues to be an important and useful health resource.

Next Protocol Navigation Lecture, May 6

The IRP Protocol Navigation Training Program Seminar Series continues with a lecture on Monday, May 6 from 1 to 2 p.m. in Bldg. 50, Conf. Rm. 1227/1328. The program is a trans-NIH effort to develop resources and tools and to provide training for intramural staff and contractors involved in protocol development, writing, coordination and management. Katherine Cooper-Arnold and Donna Jones from NHLBI’s Office of Clinical Research will present “ClinicalTrials.gov Record Transfer: The NHLBI Experience.” For more information, contact Beverly Barham, (301) 594-2494, bbarham@mail.nih.gov or Marcia Vital, (301) 451-9437, vitalm@mail.nih.gov

Brown To Speak on Equity for Disease Prevention in Minorities

Dr. C. Hendricks Brown

Dr. C. Hendricks Brown will discuss “Achieving Scientific Equity for the Prevention of Mental, Emotional and Behavioral Disorders in Minorities and Other Populations” on Thursday, May 9, from 1 to 3 p.m. in Natcher Bldg., balcony A. The seminar is part of the NIH Office of Disease Prevention’s Medicine: Mind the Gap seminar series.

Brown is professor of epidemiology and public health at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, where he is also director of the Social Systems Informatics Program in the Center for Computational Science.

Brown has developed innovative randomized field trial designs for preventing drug abuse, depression and suicide.

No advance registration is needed. Email Paris.Watson@nih.gov or call (301) 496-6615 for sign language interpreters or other reasonable accommodation.

NIH Teams with HBO on ‘Weight of the Nation for Kids,’ Airing May 7

The HHSinnovates award-winning and Emmy-nominated The Weight of the Nation obesity documentary series and public education initiative will be expanding its reach beginning on May 7 with a series of short films for young people. Leaders of the NIH obesity research task force from NIDDK, NHLBI, NICHD and NCI provided scientific guidance for The Weight of the Nation adult and youth films.

As with the original series, The Weight of the Nation for Kids is a presentation of HBO and the Institute of Medicine, in association with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and NIH, and in partnership with the Michael & Susan Dell Foundation and Kaiser Permanente.

The kids’ series consists of three half-hour segments that highlight young people actively improving the health of both themselves and their communities. The first segment in the family-friendly series, “Kebreeya’s Salad Days,” shows a teenager’s efforts to grow a school garden and change her school’s and family’s eating habits in the process. “Quiz Ed!” tests the nutrition and physical activity knowledge of students, showing steps kids can take toward a healthier lifestyle. “The Great Cafeteria Takeover,” which first aired with the original series in May 2012, will rerun, featuring New Orleans kids who transform their school lunch menu.

The films will air consecutively beginning May 7 at 5:30 p.m. EDT on HBO and will rebroadcast several times throughout May. All of the segments will air for free online at www.hbo.com/weightofthenation.
For more on the collaboration, as well as NIH weight-control information and research resources, go to www.nih.gov/health/NIHandweightofthenation/.

Winners Named in Safety Photo Contest

Photo of Towanda Carroll

Winners were recently announced in the Office of Research Services’ Division of Occupational Health and Safety 2012 “In Focus! Safe Workplaces for All” photo contest. For the second year, the contest served as an entertaining way to document workplace safety. The judges awarded first place to Howard “Wes” Hickman of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases for his photo of colleague Towanda Carroll (above). There was a tie for second place between two construction-related safety photos taken by Hickman and Dr. Dale Lewis, staff scientist at the National Cancer Institute. Third place went to Dr. Samarendra Singh, a visiting research fellow in the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. All of the winning photos can be seen at www.ors.od.nih.gov/sr/ dohs/HealthAndSafety/infocus/Pages/default.aspx. Below are contest winners (from l) Singh, Lewis and Hickman.

contest winners (from  l) Singh, Lewis and Hickman.

 


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