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NIH Record  
Vol. LXV, No. 11
  May 24, 2013
 Features
NIH Celebrates Take Your Child to Work, Earth Day
NIDDK Opens Lab in Federated States of Micronesia
Nobel Laureate Kobilka Gives Daly Lecture
Therapy Offers Personalized Care for Cancer Patients
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‘Something Amazing Happened’
Response to HIV Alters Health Care Paradigm, Says El-Sadr

Dr. Wafaa El-Sadr

Dr. Wafaa El-Sadr

The myth of the American hero glorifies the rugged individual—the cowboy who rides alone. But there’s a new model: the public health heroes. The plague fighters.

Working in their teams, there is magic.

Some people think that HIV has gone away, but over the last 3 decades, more than 60 million people globally have been infected with the virus and nearly 30 million people have died of AIDS.

This makes the ongoing work of physicians and researchers such as Dr. Wafaa El-Sadr essential. She recently visited NIH to give the annual Dr. James C. Hill Memorial Lecture, “The Global Response to the HIV Epidemic: Lessons Learned and Lasting Legacy.” A full house attended her talk in Lipsett Amphitheater.
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Autism Awareness
Author Robison’s Inspiring Story Educates about Asperger’s

John Elder Robison

John Elder Robison

“Autism made me a misfit lonely kid,” said John Elder Robison at an Apr. 17 Autism Awareness Month lecture. He spoke with such eloquence, one could easily overlook that he has Asperger’s syndrome, an autism spectrum disorder. While he is articulate and successful, Robison reminded the audience that many people with autism are not as fortunate and need help so they too can thrive.

Author of the 2007 New York Times bestseller, Look Me in the Eye: My Life with Asperger’s, Robison grew up in the 1960s before Asperger’s was commonly diagnosed. “People like me, and there are lots of us, were told we were stupid, lazy, defiant or different,” he said. “I certainly was very lonely as a child. I was a kid who never knew what to say…When you’re young, all you feel is the weight of that disability and the sting of rejection.”
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