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Vol. LXV, No. 12
June 7, 2013
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Seen

Stormwater Management Pond Nears Completion

If you’ve taken a stroll on the southeast side of campus lately, you’ve probably noticed that the construction equipment is gone and the new stormwater management pond, also known as “NIH Stoney Creek Pond,” is just about complete.

The project, constructed in partnership between NIH and Montgomery County, sits on 6 acres between NIH and Woodmont Ave. and is designed to collect water from a 204-acre watershed that includes much of downtown Bethesda and part of NIH’s campus.

The pond is designed to improve water quality and reduce stormwater flow rates and erosion in Stoney Creek, which continues on to Rock Creek and eventually feeds the Potomac River then Chesapeake Bay.

The pond had been on the drawing board since the 1990’s, but has just recently reached its final stages. Construction began in October 2010.

Now that it has been built, it will benefit lower Rock Creek and help meet the objectives of Montgomery County’s pollutant discharge elimination system.

Photos (except for bottom): Jeff Kopp

The pond occupies the southeast corner of campus, near Woodmont Ave.; Lister Hill Center (Bldg. 38A) is visible on the right.

Above: The pond occupies the southeast corner of campus, near Woodmont Ave.; Lister Hill Center (Bldg. 38A) is visible on the right.
Below, l: The stormwater inlet that replaced the previous open culvert under Woodmont Ave.
Below, r: The forebay area of the pond, which is used to collect debris and trash before entering the main body of the pond

The stormwater inlet that replaced the previous open culvert under Woodmont Ave.
The forebay area of the pond, which is used to collect debris and trash before entering the main body of the pond
The way things used to be at Stoney Creek, photo circa January 2011
The way things used to be at Stoney Creek, photo circa January 2011

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