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NIH Record  
Vol. LXV, No. 15
  July 19, 2013
 Features
Photography as ‘Truth’ Has Always Been In Dispute, Greenberg Says
NIH ‘Green Champions’ Honored for Creativity, Commitment
Woo Demonstrates Connection Between Heart Failure, Brain
Grady Discusses Role of Science in Health Policy at ONS Congress
NIH News in Health Celebrates 100 Issues
Health Leaders Discuss Noncommunicable Diseases
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NIH Holds ‘Listening Session’ for LGBTI Health Issues

NIH principal deputy director Dr. Lawrence Tabak (second from r) opens session as NIH director Dr. Francis Collins (r) and NICHD director Dr. Alan Guttmacher (l) look on. Not fully visible is Dr. Michael Gottesman, NIH deputy director for intramural research.

NIH principal deputy director Dr. Lawrence Tabak (second from r) opens session as NIH director Dr. Francis Collins (r) and NICHD director Dr. Alan Guttmacher (l) look on. Not fully visible is Dr. Michael Gottesman, NIH deputy director for intramural research.

Advocates and researchers for health issues involving lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) communities had the full attention of NIH leadership on June 27 as NIH hosted a 90-minute “listening session” in Wilson Hall.

NIH director Dr. Francis Collins, principal deputy director Dr. Lawrence Tabak, deputy director for intramural research Dr. Michael Gottesman and NICHD director Dr. Alan Guttmacher took comments and discussed issues with a dozen guests who attended.

The most common refrain heard at the session was the need for LGBTI populations (which includes members of the Native American Two Spirit community) to be designated as a health disparities population, which would make them eligible for federally funded research and research-related opportunities specific to health disparity populations. That decision currently rests with the HHS assistant secretary for health. NIH was also urged to bolster career development for LGBTI investigators, who are familiar with the needs of their communities, as well as for investigators interested in or working on LGBTI health research.
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‘We Have to Be the Catalysts’
Women of Color Research Network Offers ‘GPS’ for Navigating Science Careers

Dr. Janine Clayton

Dr. Janine Clayton

All roads lead to…science? Perhaps not. There are, however, a great many paths to a satisfying career in science. The challenge is navigating your own best route. Wouldn’t it be useful to have some sort of GPS—global positioning system—for finding your way around your profession? Maps revealing hidden detours. A trusted tour guide who’s been the same way you’re traveling. How about wise advice from locals who know the terrain? That’s where the Women of Color Research Network (WoCRn) can help.

Can I Get There from Here?

Hundreds of women scientists at various points in their education and training find themselves searching for the next step in their careers. Or, more likely, they’re considering several options and want to know which to explore and which to ignore. For women of color pursuing professions in science, technology, engineering and math, the problem is especially acute and can occur much earlier.
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