skip navigation nih record
Vol. LXV, No. 23
November 8, 2013
cover

previous story

next story



NINR Director Discusses Impact of Nursing Science

University of Miami president Dr. Donna Shalala (l), NINR director Dr. Patricia Grady (c) and the dean of University of Miami School of Nursing and Health Studies, Dr. Nilda Peragallo Montano

University of Miami president Dr. Donna Shalala (l), NINR director Dr. Patricia Grady (c) and the dean of University of Miami School of Nursing and Health Studies, Dr. Nilda Peragallo Montano

Photo: University of Miami School of Nursing and Health Studies

NINR director Dr. Patricia Grady recently spoke at a reception marking the 65th anniversary of the University of Miami School of Nursing and Health Studies. The event, which initiated a year-long celebration of the school’s 65th birthday, drew university trustees, leaders, faculty and clinical and community partners.

Grady’s talk focused on nursing science and its impact on health care. She began by defining NINR’s role in nursing science and the overarching philosophy that the institute and UM’s School of Nursing and Health Studies both share—the importance of engaging communities in order to conduct meaningful research that will be successfully adopted into widespread practice.

“NINR is proud to have supported your school’s highly relevant research,” Grady told attendees. “Nursing science, as exemplified by the research conducted here, will continue to grow the evidence base for health care practice.”

Grady described NINR’s research interests—including symptom science, wellness, self-management and end-of-life and palliative care—and reflected on the impact that the findings from related studies have made on health care practice. “Nursing science provides a foundation for clinicians who strive to improve disease and symptom management in a variety of health care settings and across diverse populations,” she said, citing several examples of NINR-funded research and how it is being used in clinical practice.

“You represent the present and the future nursing science leaders and we are counting on you as the value and importance of our profession continues to grow,” she concluded. “I firmly believe that the next 65 years will see enormous advances in health and health care and that nursing science will play a leading role in making those advancements possible.”


back to top of page