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NIH Record  
Vol. LXVI, No. 2
  January 17, 2014
 Features
Gates Discusses R&D Efforts to Improve Health in Developing Countries
NIDDK Researchers Chronicle Advances Against Sickle Cell Anemia, Diabetes
NIBIB Partners with India on Blood Pressure Initiative
August To Discuss Discoveries in T Cell Immune Responses, Jan. 22
Congressional Representatives Meet With NIDDK Staff, Grantees
NIH Boosts Grant-Earning Capacity in Africa
Fogarty, Partners Celebrate Decade of Global Neuroscience Research
 Departments
Briefs
Milestones
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Patient Reunites with Life-Saving Scientist
NIH Science Permits ‘Command Performance’

NCI’s Dr. Steven Rosenberg reunites with former patient Linda Taylor, whose cancer vanished 29 years ago. She was interviewed for a PBS series.
NCI’s Dr. Steven Rosenberg reunites with former patient Linda Taylor, whose cancer vanished 29 years ago. She was interviewed for a PBS series.
By the time Linda Taylor arrived at the Clinical Center in November 1984 with advanced metastatic melanoma, 80 patients with a similar diagnosis had come to NCI Surgery Branch chief Dr. Steven Rosenberg for experimental treatment with an immune system stimulant called interleukin-2 (IL-2) or for administration of immune cells. All of them died of their disease.

No one, including Rosenberg, guessed that patient No. 81, Taylor, would become what he calls “a historic figure in modern oncology. She’s really part of the history of the NIH and the Clinical Center.”

Taylor is the first cancer patient to be cured by immunotherapy, a treatment pioneered in Rosenberg’s branch that has now matured into an exciting field that made worldwide headlines in December when researchers in Philadelphia announced stunning regressions in cases of leukemia. Science magazine labeled cancer immunotherapy its 2013 “Breakthrough of the Year.”
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‘An Incredible Place’
NIH Alum Pizzo Returns, Applauds Unique Environment

Dr. Philip Pizzo is warmly welcomed back to NIH.
Dr. Philip Pizzo is warmly welcomed back to NIH.
Before there was a Children’s Inn at NIH. Long before the current 75+ percent survival rate for pediatric cancers or the new hope for an AIDS-free generation. Before HIV and AIDS were even realities, there was a young physician finishing his residency at Children’s Hospital in Boston. Interested in research, infectious disease and cancer, he was abruptly summoned to Bethesda in June 1973. NIH needed a pediatrician to treat “Teddy,” a boy living in a sealed room on the 13th floor of the Clinical Center.

“This was one of those galvanizing changes in life that really altered my career and who I think I am as an individual,” said the former resident, Dr. Phil Pizzo, now also former dean of Stanford medical school and former chief come home of NCI’s Pediatric Oncology Branch.
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