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Vol. LXVI, No. 2
January 17, 2014
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Congressional Representatives Meet with NIDDK Staff, Grantees
More than 20 members of bipartisan congressional staffs (shown here with NIDDK staff, researchers and grantees) came to NIH recently to learn about NIH-supported type 1 diabetes research, as well as about the benefits of investment in NIH.
More than 20 members of bipartisan congressional staffs (shown here with NIDDK staff, researchers and grantees) came to NIH recently to learn about NIH-supported type 1 diabetes research, as well as about the benefits of investment in NIH.

At the request of the Congressional Diabetes Caucus, more than 20 members of bipartisan congressional staffs came to NIH recently to learn about type 1 diabetes research and the role of NIH in improving public health.

All heard about results, current studies and future opportunities in type 1 diabetes research, including those made possible by the Special Statutory Funding Program for Type 1 Diabetes Research—a $150 million annual appropriation that is spearheaded by NIDDK in collaboration with other NIH components and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Congressional staffers tour the lab of NIDDK intramural investigator Dr. Sushil Rane during a recent visit to learn about advances and emerging opportunities in NIH-supported type 1 diabetes research.

Congressional staffers tour the lab of NIDDK intramural investigator Dr. Sushil Rane during a recent visit to learn about advances and emerging opportunities in NIH-supported type 1 diabetes research.

Photos: Jen Rymaruk

NIH director Dr. Francis Collins spoke to the staffers about the benefits of investment in NIH, the power and promise of research and the effect of shrinking funding. “We’re on a roll,” he said, “but unfortunately we can’t be on a roll at the pace that science would allow.”

Following Collins, NIDDK director Dr. Griffin Rodgers provided an overview of diabetes and its complications and introduced speakers who presented on type 1 diabetes research being conducted in the extramural research community and in the NIDDK Intramural Research Program. They spoke about major advances made and emerging opportunities in the fields of artificial pancreas technologies and diabetic eye and kidney diseases, among other topics. The staffers also toured two NIDDK labs and heard a patient speak about the positive impact that type 1 research advances have made on her life.

There have been “a tremendous number of discoveries and innovations that have resulted from these special funds,” Rodgers said.—Amy F. Reiter


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