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Vol. LXVI, No. 3
January 31, 2014
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NINR Launches Innovative Questions Initiative

NINR director Dr. Patricia Grady (c) addresses the “Symptom Science: Promoting Personalized Health Strategies” workshop participants.
NINR director Dr. Patricia Grady (c) addresses the “Symptom Science: Promoting Personalized Health Strategies” workshop participants.

The National Institute of Nursing Research recently kicked off its Innovative Questions (IQ) initiative with a workshop on symptom science. Leading scientists and interdisciplinary experts discussed research questions to guide the future of nursing science. The workshop set the tone for the broader IQ initiative, which features a series of workshops and a public web site designed for online engagement.

“The Innovative Questions initiative is designed to advance NINR’s research agenda by engaging with stakeholders within our community, providing you, your colleagues and the public opportunities to help shape the future of nursing science,” said NINR director Dr. Patricia Grady. “The IQ initiative will help us identify innovative research questions to guide our efforts.”

NINR supports clinical, biological and translational research in many areas, including symptom science, wellness, self-management and end-of-life and palliative care. Nursing science draws together experts from diverse disciplines and professions—from nursing and medicine to engineering and business management. “The interdisciplinary nature of nursing science is why continually engaging with a diverse group of stakeholders is important to its advancement,” explained Grady. “IQ is one strategy for facilitating this engagement here and across the country.”

Each IQ workshop will focus on major themes that flow from NINR’s strategic plan. The IQ web site, which launched in mid-November, solicits innovative research questions directly from the scientific community, professional organizations and the public. Visitors to the site have an opportunity to submit research questions and to review and comment on questions submitted by others.

“This initiative is an excellent opportunity for our community to play a role in guiding nursing science,” Grady said. “The questions identified through this initiative offer the promise of generating the novel research and interventions vital to the advancement of nursing science and health care now and in years to come.”

To learn more about the initiative or to submit innovative research questions, visit www.ninr.nih.gov/IQ.—Natalie Zeigler


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