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Vol. LXVI, No. 5
February 28, 2014
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Briefs

Cuervo To Give Pittman Lecture, Mar. 19

Dr.  Ana Maria Cuervo

Dr. Ana Maria Cuervo of Albert Einstein College of Medicine will give the annual NIH Director’s Margaret Pittman Lecture on Wednesday, Mar. 19 at 3 p.m. in Masur Auditorium, Bldg. 10. Her topic is “Did You Remember to Take Out the Trash? Your Cells Sure Did!”

Cuervo studies the role of protein-degradation in aging and age-related disorders, with an emphasis in neurodegeneration. Her group is interested in understanding how altered proteins can be eliminated from cells. Her laboratory has linked alterations in lysosomal protein degradation (autophagy) with different neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s and Huntington’s disease. They have also proven that restoration of normal lysosomal function prevents accumulation of damaged proteins with age, demonstrating that removal of these toxic products is possible.

The lecture honors Dr. Margaret Pittman, NIH’s first female lab chief, who made significant contributions to microbiology and vaccine development, particularly in the areas of pertussis and tetanus, during her long career at NIAID.

The lecture is part of the Wednesday Afternoon Lecture series. For information and reasonable accommodation, call Jacqueline Roberts, (301) 594-6747.

STEP Forum on ‘Where Babies Come From’

The staff training in extramural programs (STEP) committee will present “Where Do Babies Come From? (Revised Edition),” on Tuesday, Mar. 11 from 9 a.m. to noon in Rockledge II, Rm. 9116.

Such a simple question, such a complicated answer in today’s society. As fertility treatments have become widely available, tens of thousands of babies have been born using medically assisted reproductive technologies. What are the costs, what are the risks? Join us as we explore not only the latest technologies, but also access disparities, ethical issues and potential long-term outcomes for children and families.

Batter Up! Orioles, Nationals Ticket Sales

R&W will once again offer tickets to the Baltimore Orioles and Washington Nationals. To better serve the community, tickets will be sold online. Orioles tickets go on sale Tuesday, Mar. 11 at 8 a.m. at www.fedesp.com/nih/rw-services/rw-online-store/. Available are two regular season tickets (2 seats behind first base – Section 14BBB, seats 7-8). Nationals tickets go on sale Thursday, Mar. 13 at 8 a.m. at the same web address. Available are 2 seats in Section 219, Row D. Prices for all games will be announced on the R&W listserv and in the March R&W Newsletter. You must be a 2014 R&W member to purchase tickets. Memberships can be purchased at R&W stores or online and cost $9 for the year. For details on auctions of opening day tickets for both the Nationals and Orioles, email nihrw@mail.nih.gov.

NIH Management Intern Program Recruits

Unlock a new career path with the NIH Management Intern Program, which is recruiting Apr. 7-11. The MI Program is a highly competitive, 2-year career-development program for current NIH employees. MIs come from a variety of job backgrounds including both scientific and administrative fields. Upon completion of the program, MIs transition into an administrative-management career in one of many areas throughout the NIH enterprise. Eligible employees are invited to apply. For program FAQs, upcoming information sessions and details about eligibility, visit http://trainingcenter.nih.gov/intern/mi/.

Changes Coming to HR Systems

The Department of Health and Human Services is implementing a program that will move HHS agencies to new human resources (HR) systems as well as change payroll service providers. HHS is calling this effort the HR Modernization Program, also referred to as the National Finance Center (NFC) migration. Agencies will be moving to the new systems in several waves, with NIH’s migration estimated to be rolling out in early 2015.

NFC systems will replace three of NIH’s current systems: myPay, the Integrated Time and Attendance System (ITAS) and Capital HR (EHRP) with a suite of integrated systems offering enhanced functionality, reduced costs, improved data accuracy and standardized processes throughout HHS.

Currently, NIH teams are working to ensure that the data housed in NIH’s HR systems is current and accurate. This will assure a smoother transition when the new systems deploy. The NIH HR modernization program team has given presentations to administrative officers, executive officers and others to keep NIH staff informed.

As NIH gets closer to implementation, the team will ensure that NIH is prepared for the new systems. The team will provide change management tools for staff such as web sites, training and user guides, in addition to ongoing communication.

For more information, visit http://hr.od.nih.gov/hrsystems/nfcmigration.htm. You may also join the HR modernization Yammer group by logging into www.yammer.com.

Questions? Contact NFCMigration@mail.nih.gov.

NLM Lecture Features Weng, Mar. 5

Dr. Chunhua Weng

The National Library of Medicine Informatics Lecture Series will feature Dr. Chunhua Weng on Wednesday, Mar. 5, from 2 to 3 p.m. in Natcher Bldg., balcony A. She will speak on “Bridging the Semantic Gap Between Clinical Research Eligibility Criteria and Clinical Data.”

With the burgeoning adoption of electronic health records (EHRs), vast amounts of clinical data are increasingly available for computational reuse. However, there is a semantic gap between the raw clinical data and free-text human-provided eligibility criteria. Weng will describe the evolving understanding of the semantic gap and approaches to overcoming it in the context of EHR-based phenotyping and clinical trial prescreening.

Weng is the Florence Irving assistant professor of biomedical informatics at Columbia University, where she has been a faculty member since 2007.

The talk will be broadcast live and archived at http://videocast.nih.gov/. Sign language interpreters will be provided. Those who need reasonable accommodation to participate should contact Ebony Hughes, (301) 451-8038, Ebony.Hughes@nih.gov or the Federal Relay (1-800-877-8339).

Heart Health Awareness Gets Boost

“Get heart healthy!” shouted more than 100 NIH’ers who gathered in the Clinical Center’s atrium on Feb. 3 to help make a video to promote National Wear Red Day on Feb. 7. The group created an 18-foot-wide heart to help raise awareness about women and heart disease. February is American Heart Month. Over the past decades, NIH research has played a key role in the dramatic decline in heart disease mortality. “Help us to spread the word that heart disease is preventable,” said NHLBI director Dr. Gary Gibbons. “By making healthy lifestyle changes and taking steps to manage risk factors, we can reduce the risk for heart disease.” Gibbons is in the front row at bottom, along with NIH director Dr. Francis Collins, CC director Dr. John Gallin, NIDDK director Dr. Griffin Rodgers and ORWH director Dr. Janine Clayton.
“Get heart healthy!” shouted more than 100 NIH’ers who gathered in the Clinical Center’s atrium on Feb. 3 to help make a video to promote National Wear Red Day on Feb. 7. The group created an 18-foot-wide heart to help raise awareness about women and heart disease. February is American Heart Month. Over the past decades, NIH research has played a key role in the dramatic decline in heart disease mortality. “Help us to spread the word that heart disease is preventable,” said NHLBI director Dr. Gary Gibbons. “By making healthy lifestyle changes and taking steps to manage risk factors, we can reduce the risk for heart disease.” Gibbons is in the front row at bottom, along with NIH director Dr. Francis Collins, CC director Dr. John Gallin, NIDDK director Dr. Griffin Rodgers and ORWH director Dr. Janine Clayton.

Campus Feels Effects of Unusual Snow Season

The Bethesda campus showed the impact of an unusually snowy winter so far in the D.C. area. Some communities saw upwards of 3 feet of the white stuff over the course of a 2-week span—the largest measurable amounts since “Snow-mageddon” in 2010. Grounds and buildings were closed to all but the essential on a couple of occasions when travel was deemed unfit for the masses.

Photos: Bill Branson, Andy Harbert

The Bethesda campus showed the impact of an unusually snowy winter so far in the D.C. area. Some communities saw upwards of 3 feet of the white stuff over the course of a 2-week span—the largest measurable amounts since “Snow-mageddon” in 2010
Grounds and buildings were closed to all but the essential on a couple of occasions when travel was deemed unfit for the masses. Grounds and buildings were closed to all but the essential on a couple of occasions when travel was deemed unfit for the masses.

 


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