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NIH Record  
Vol. LXVI, No. 8
  April 11, 2014
 Features
Brawley Calls for ‘Rational, Evidence-Based’ Medicine
NCCAM Lecturer Explains Herb-Drug Interactions
Winter 2014 Was for Snow Lovers
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Train Mind to Change Brain?
Visualizing Future May Help Weight Loss, Epstein Says

Everybody wants immediate gratification, but some people have a harder time than others in resisting their impulses, says Dr. Leonard H. Epstein. He is finding ways to counter that tendency.
Everybody wants immediate gratification, but some people have a harder time than others in resisting their impulses, says Dr. Leonard H. Epstein. He is finding ways to counter that tendency.
Dr. Leonard H. Epstein of the University at Buffalo has found that visualizing a positive future event can help control the impulse to overeat.

“This is two ideas put together: the motivation to eat and the inability to delay gratification,” he said. “This is a central idea to people doing research on drugs, now applied to studying obesity.”

The SUNY distinguished professor of pediatrics and chief of behavioral medicine recently discussed his research results in Natcher Bldg. An expert in childhood obesity, Epstein is known for a warm and open teaching style. His talk, “Reinforcement Pathology: Leadfoot and Worn Brakes,” was sponsored by the Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research.


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Trash Talk
Cuervo Explains How Our Cells Discard, Recycle Matter

Dr. Ana Maria Cuervo
Dr. Ana Maria Cuervo
As we learn more about the inner workings of cells, we’re uncovering clues that may help us delay the effects of aging and disease. It all begins with lysosomes—the cannibals of the cellular world.

Within each cell, a lysosome is a sac of enzymes that digests anything in it. The lysosome devours proteins, lipids, even pathogens that enter from outside the cell, as well as components within the cell. The nutrients get broken down and recycled while the unusable waste gets destroyed. This process—the breakdown, recycling and disposing of cellular components—is known as autophagy.


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