skip navigation nih record
Vol. LXVI, No. 8
April 11, 2014
cover

previous story

next story



Winter 2014 Was for Snow Lovers

Call them “snowfodils.” These discouraged stalks were shrouded in snow that fell the week of Mar. 24. In many years, the daffodils have come and gone by that date. But the chill of winter 2014 kept them abed until late March, and even then it was too early for comfortable display.

this chilly frog was sighted just outside Bldg. 37, near the new Porter Bldg. You can almost hear Kermit wearily asking, “When will this stuff go away?”
Call them “snowfodils.” These discouraged stalks were shrouded in snow that fell the week of Mar. 24. In many years, the daffodils have come and gone by that date. But the chill of winter 2014 kept them abed until late March, and even then it was too early for comfortable display.

At right, this chilly frog was sighted just outside Bldg. 37, near the new Porter Bldg. You can almost hear Kermit wearily asking, “When will this stuff go away?”

Below, the winter of 2014 was like one of those horror movies where the villain, once thought dead, keeps coming back to life. It cannot be said with confidence, even in April, that we won’t see another flake. The most enduring evidence of winter is the “NIH glacier.” Examples can be found on the shady sides of campus parking structures, where plowed snow has been dumped. The photo below shows the west side of MLP-9. Anyone care to wager when the last evidence of snow disappears?

Photos: Bill Branson, Rich McManus

the winter of 2014 was like one of those horror movies where the villain, once thought dead, keeps coming back to life. It cannot be said with confidence, even in April, that we won’t see another flake. The most enduring evidence of winter is the “NIH glacier.” Examples can be found on the shady sides of campus parking structures, where plowed snow has been dumped. The photo below shows the west side of MLP-9. Anyone care to wager when the last evidence of snow disappears?

back to top of page