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Vol. LXVI, No. 13
June 20, 2014
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NIAIDís Jeang Honored with Memorial Garden, Lecture

The garden features a center granite medallion inlaid with the logo of a journal founded by Jeang.
The garden features a center granite medallion inlaid with the logo of a journal founded by Jeang.
On May 15, in memory of Dr. Kuan-Teh Jeang, the first Jeang Memorial Lecture took place in Lipsett Amphitheater and the Society of Chinese Bioscientists in America (SCBA) Washington, D.C., chapter dedicated the Jeang Memorial Garden to NIH.

Teh, as Jeang was known to friends and colleagues, was a world-class retrovirologist, a dedicated mentor and a renowned advocate for increased representation of Asian and other minority scientists in leadership positions in America. He served as president of SCBA from 2010-2012. Under his leadership, the society has united Chinese bioscientists from Taiwan, Hong Kong and mainland China into one society with one goal.

NIH has established an annual Jeang Memorial Lecture series to honor his legacy. Dr. Yuan Chang of the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute gave the first Jeang lecture. She spoke of her friendship with Jeang and her discovery of Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpes virus and Merkel cell polyomavirus, two of only seven viruses known to cause human cancers.

The Jeang Memorial Garden, located between Bldgs. 31 and 6, became a reality due to a large number of donations collected by SCBA, deep involvement of Jeang’s family and strong support from NIH. The garden features a center granite medallion that is inlaid with the logo of Retrovirology, an open-access journal founded by Jeang, and a boulder with a plaque recounting his accomplishments.

The garden dedication ceremony was hosted by Dr. Paul Liu of NHGRI. Jeang’s widow, Diane Jeang, gave heartfelt comments about Jeang and what this garden meant to her and her family. As the medallion and the plaque were unveiled by representatives of the Jeang family and SCBA, sun penetrated the clouds.

Dr. Anthony Fauci, NIAID director, humorously reminisced about lab meetings he shared with Jeang. Dr. Malcolm Martin, a long-time colleague and Jeang’s lab chief at NIAID, paid tribute to Jeang’s remarkable mentorship of nearly 40 students and postdoctoral trainees during his tenure at NIH.

Dr. Karen Kibler, a former postdoctoral fellow in Jeang’s lab, recounted his intense curiosity, vigorous passion and his honest and straightforward style, ending with a comment from one of Jeang’s trainees: “Forever, thank you, Teh.”

Dr. Michael Gottesman, NIH deputy director for intramural research, closed the ceremony, pledging that the NIH would continue its efforts to provide equal opportunity for Chinese, Asian and minority scientists.

On hand for dedication of the Jeang Memorial Garden are (from l) Diana Jeang (Jeang’s daughter), Yunbo Shi, Lan Lin (daughter of Jeang’s cousin), Dr. Karen Kibler, Krishna Banaudha, Chen Jeang (Jeang’s brother), Diane Jeang (Jeang’s widow), Dr. Michael Gottesman, Dr. Richard Nakamura, Dr. Malcolm Martin, Wei Yang, Zhi-ming Zheng, Barbara Thomas (Jeang’s mother-in-law), Jessica Jeang (Jeang’s niece) and Dr. Paul Liu. Below is the dedicatory plaque mounted on a display rock.
On hand for dedication of the Jeang Memorial Garden are (from l) Diana Jeang (Jeang’s daughter), Yunbo Shi, Lan Lin (daughter of Jeang’s cousin), Dr. Karen Kibler, Krishna Banaudha, Chen Jeang (Jeang’s brother), Diane Jeang (Jeang’s widow), Dr. Michael Gottesman, Dr. Richard Nakamura, Dr. Malcolm Martin, Wei Yang, Zhi-ming Zheng, Barbara Thomas (Jeang’s mother-in-law), Jessica Jeang (Jeang’s niece) and Dr. Paul Liu. Below is the dedicatory plaque mounted on a display rock.
the dedicatory plaque mounted on a display rock.

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