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Vol. LXVI, No. 15
July 18, 2014
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Seen

Exhibit at Dulles, Online
Stunning Images Showcase NIH Science

Eye-popping. Jaw-dropping. Psychedelic. Those are just three of the ways people have described Life: Magnified, an exhibit of 46 striking images captured using cutting-edge microscopes. Most of the images came from NIH intramural and extramural scientists.

Life: Magnified is showing in two sites—at Washington Dulles International Airport through November and online at www.nigms.nih.gov/education/life-magnified.

“Through brightly colored images of healthy cells and tissues—and equally stunning representations of a wide range of diseases—the exhibit showcases the beauty and intricacy of biomedical research,” said NIGMS director Dr. Jon Lorsch.

More than a million people are expected to view the collection during its 6-month stay at the airport. Even more are seeing it online, as it has already been widely covered by a variety of major news and social media outlets including NBC News.com, National Geographic, The Atlantic, the Washington Post, Weather.com and Buzzfeed.

The images were selected from more than 600 submitted in response to calls from NIGMS and the American Society for Cell Biology, which co-sponsored the exhibit along with the Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority’s Arts Program.

For more about the images visit http://directorsblog.nih.gov/2014/06/10/snapshots-of-life-a-fantastic-voyage-inside-the-airport.—Alisa Zapp Machalek

a human liver cell

Life: Magnified. Above, a human liver cell, and at right, a grasshopper ovary—both images are the work of NIH grantees.

Below: Taking in the gallery recently are (from l) NIH director Dr. Francis Collins, Yale researcher Dr. Jo Handelsman and NIH deputy director for intramural research Dr. Michael Gottesman. Scientists from NIH’s Intramural Research Program also contributed several images to the collection.

ASCB Photo: Charles Votaw Photography

a grasshopper ovary—both images are the work of NIH grantees.
Taking in the gallery recently are (from l) NIH director Dr. Francis Collins, Yale researcher Dr. Jo Handelsman and NIH deputy director for intramural research Dr. Michael Gottesman. Scientists from NIH’s Intramural Research Program also contributed several images to the collection.

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