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NIH Record  
Vol. LXVI, No. 25
  December 5, 2014
 Features
Veterans’ Sacrifices Honored at NIH Ceremony
NIH Embarks on Deer Management Plan
R&W Brings Car-Sharing to NIH
Experts Discuss Building Health into the Environment
NINDS Holds Nonprofit Forum, Focuses on Partnerships
NIAMS Hosts Its First Bilingual Twitter Chat
Six from NIH Named AAAS Fellows
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Artist, ‘Father of Neuroscience’
Nobelist Cajal’s Drawings Now on Exhibit at NIH

Shown Nov. 7 cutting the ribbon on the new exhibit are (from l) NINDS acting director Dr. Walter Koroshetz, Dr. Ricardo Martinez-Murillo, vice director of Spain’s Cajal Institute, which loaned the art to NIH, and NINDS senior investigator Dr. Jeffrey Diamond.
Shown Nov. 7 cutting the ribbon on the new exhibit are (from l) NINDS acting director Dr. Walter Koroshetz, Dr. Ricardo Martinez-Murillo, vice director of Spain’s Cajal Institute, which loaned the art to NIH, and NINDS senior investigator Dr. Jeffrey Diamond.
Since their once-in-a-lifetime trip to view the collected works of Spanish scientist-artist Santiago Ramon y Cajal, NIH senior investigator Dr. Jeffrey Diamond and former NIH artist-in-residence Rebecca Kamen have been anxious to share some of Cajal’s original art with a larger audience. Their diligence paid off recently when 7 drawings by the Father of Modern Neuroscience traveled to the United States to be exhibited in the Porter Neuroscience Research Center.

“Everyone—at least everyone involved in science—knows that science is a creative process,” explained Diamond, an art aficionado who, as a neuroscientist in NINDS’s synaptic physiology section, studies the retina.

“These drawings by Cajal, who was an artist, anatomist and is considered the father of modern neuroscience, will be inspiring to the scientists who work here. There’s a huge educational component to this.”


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Inspiring People
Panel Discusses Importance of Mentor Relationships

NIH alum Dr. Ernest Marquez speaks on mentorship.
NIH alum Dr. Ernest Marquez speaks on mentorship.
“Where are the others like me?” they’d wondered, as young, aspiring scientists who were members of the Hispanic or Native American communities. This sentiment motivated a group of scientists 40 years ago to found SACNAS—Society for Advancement of Chicanos and Native Americans in Science. With 155 chapters across the country, SACNAS helps connect these ethnic communities to resources, opportunities and mentors.

Good mentoring relationships can shape careers and have a lifelong impact. But what makes a good mentor? How do you get a mentor or become one? How can mentors be effective across cultures? At a recent seminar sponsored by NIH’s SACNAS chapter, panelists offered personal perspectives and advice, underscoring cultural diversity as integral to a robust scientific workforce.


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