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Vol. LXVII, No. 2
January 16, 2015
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Briefs

2014 Green Champion Nominations Now Open

All employees are welcome to nominate a colleague, group, organization or even themselves for a 2014 HHS Green Champion Award. Nominations can be submitted in one of 10 categories and will recognize excellence and innovation by HHS employees for their FY 2014 sustainability efforts in these categories: good neighbor; change agents; corporate responsibility; electronic stewardship and data centers; environmental stewardship; energy/fleet management; green hero video outreach; sustainable acquisitions; sustainable design and facilities and regional planning; and water use efficiency and management.

Due to HHS by Jan. 23, nominations can be submitted online at https://docs.google.com/document/d/1SaFvKzmT1PRpi82dES49GZ4TYRUWkMOcJZmzMQ8S1qA/pub.

Credit Union Marks Diamond Anniversary

This year, the NIH Federal Credit Union marks 75 years of continuous operation. On Jan. 11, 1940, when nine federal employees pooled $75 and began transacting business out of a shoebox, NIHFCU was born. From a cramped 5’x6’ space in Bldg. 1 (shared with the NIH telephone operator) to today’s advanced mobile banking solutions, NIHFCU has enjoyed a fascinating history.

Today, as the nation’s largest credit union serving the biomedical industry, NIHFCU thanks all its members—past and present—for their loyalty and contributions to the credit union’s longevity and success.

“The 75-year evolution of the NIHFCU from its humble beginnings is truly remarkable,” said Rick Wieczorek, NIHFCU president and CEO. “This credit union’s ability to grow through the vast social, regulatory and economic changes over the decades is a tribute to all those who have touched the NIHFCU in some way over the years. This includes our volunteer and passionate board and committee members and dedicated employees. And, of course, we are most grateful to our loyal membership who continue to provide us with the privilege of serving their financial needs.”

Throughout 2015, NIHFCU will announce special ways to celebrate its diamond anniversary with you. NIHFCU members (and non-members) are invited to visit the credit union’s anniversary web page—nihfcu.org/75—for news and announcements.

  • Step back in time to view archived NIHFCU photos, stories and news clips (many from archived editions of the NIH Record)

  • Share your special NIHFCU story

  • Learn about Diamond Anniversary promotions.

NIDA Hosts Mini-Convention, Presents Award

NIDA director Dr. Nora Volkow (c) also introduced Dr. Paul Phillips (l), the 2014 winner of the Jacob P. Waletzky Award, which recognizes scientists for innovative research on substance use or addiction. At right is 2013 winner Dr. Rita Goldstein. NIDA recently hosted its annual 1-day mini-convention Frontiers in Addiction Research, a satellite event of the Society for Neuroscience annual meeting. NIDA-supported scientists from around the world presented recent findings and discussed future directions in neuroscience and addiction research. Event highlights included advances in imaging technologies; drug use and brain toxicity; and the therapeutic potential of RNA. NIDA director Dr. Nora Volkow (c) also introduced Dr. Paul Phillips (l), the 2014 winner of the Jacob P. Waletzky Award, which recognizes scientists for innovative research on substance use or addiction. At right is 2013 winner Dr. Rita Goldstein.

NIDA Grantee Trains Tijuana Police Officers

Tijuana’s police chief publicly thanked Strathdee and her colleagues. Also on hand at the graduation were (from l) Teresita Rocha, Dr. Efraim Patino, Dr. Thomas Patterson, Jaime Arredondo and Ofcr. Tellez Gonzalez. NIDA grantee Dr. Steffanie Strathdee (second from r) of the University of California San Diego School of Medicine recently attended the graduation ceremony of the Tijuana, Mexico, police officers she trained in public health and safety education with respect to drug abuse-related HIV prevention. The pilot education program taught police how to manage drug-using offenders humanely and safely, including safe management of needles and other drug paraphernalia, as well as promoting referral to treatment for offenders suffering from drug addiction. Tijuana’s police chief publicly thanked Strathdee and her colleagues. Also on hand at the graduation were (from l) Teresita Rocha, Dr. Efraim Patino, Dr. Thomas Patterson, Jaime Arredondo and Ofcr. Tellez Gonzalez.

Role of Disc Degeneration in Pain Explored

Participants included NIAMS director Dr. Stephen Katz (front, second from l), deputy director Dr. Robert Carter (front, fourth from l) and staff members Drs. Jim Panagis (back, third from l), Gayle Lester (back, fifth from r), Joan McGowan (front, second from r) and Bernadette Tyree (front, third from r). Dr. Partap Khalsa from NCCIH (back, l) and Dr. Lynda Porter from NINDS (back, second from l) also contributed to the discussion.
NIH-funded basic, translational and clinical researchers recently met with NIAMS leadership and staff to discuss research needs and opportunities related to structural, biomechanical and biochemical changes in the intervertebral disc that can lead to chronic neck and back pain. Part of the institute’s scientific planning process, the full-day roundtable addressed topics including the pathological changes that lead to disc degeneration; the development of tools that can distinguish between changes that lead to pain and those that are asymptomatic; and ways in which high-throughput technologies might be used to identify biochemical, imaging and genetic biomarkers of symptomatic disc degeneration and spinal pathology. Participants included NIAMS director Dr. Stephen Katz (front, second from l), deputy director Dr. Robert Carter (front, fourth from l) and staff members Drs. Jim Panagis (back, third from l), Gayle Lester (back, fifth from r), Joan McGowan (front, second from r) and Bernadette Tyree (front, third from r). Dr. Partap Khalsa from NCCIH (back, l) and Dr. Lynda Porter from NINDS (back, second from l) also contributed to the discussion.

Benefits of Physical Activity To Be Explored

Have you ever wondered why physical activity is good for us? Have you ever been confused about how much and what type of exercise(s) you should do? Recently, 15 investigators from across the United States met with NIH staff to discuss ways to stimulate studies that may answer these important public health questions. The Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Physical Activity-Induced Benefits Workshop—sponsored by the NIH Common Fund, NIA, NIAMS and NIDDK—focused on tools and resources that could help laboratory and clinical researchers explain how cells throughout the body respond to physical activity and how those changes translate into better physical and mental health. The meeting was part of the Common Fund planning process that explores the needs of the broad scientific community and within NIH

Have you ever wondered why physical activity is good for us? Have you ever been confused about how much and what type of exercise(s) you should do? Recently, 15 investigators from across the United States met with NIH staff to discuss ways to stimulate studies that may answer these important public health questions. The Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Physical Activity-Induced Benefits Workshop—sponsored by the NIH Common Fund, NIA, NIAMS and NIDDK—focused on tools and resources that could help laboratory and clinical researchers explain how cells throughout the body respond to physical activity and how those changes translate into better physical and mental health. The meeting was part of the Common Fund planning process that explores the needs of the broad scientific community and within NIH. A videocast of the meeting is archived at http://videocast.nih.gov/summary.asp?Live=14922.

Photo: Bill Branson

 


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