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Vol. LXVII, No. 3
January 30, 2015
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Briefs

Author, Olympian St. John Gives DDM Seminar

The Deputy Director for Management (DDM) announces the second DDM seminar of the 2014-2015 series “Management and Science: Partnering for Excellence.” The event on Thursday, Feb. 12 from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in Masur Auditorium, Bldg. 10, will feature Bonnie St. John, who will discuss “Normal Is Overrated—Aim Higher.” She will focus on how to achieve excellence when the circumstances are less than ideal and provide techniques to offset the negative effects of stress, increase resilience and achieve high performance.

Videocasting and sign language will be provided. Individuals who need reasonable accommodation to attend should contact the NIH Training Center at (301) 496-6211 or the Federal Relay Service at 1-800-877-8339.

For more information about the series, visit www.ddmseries.od.nih.gov or call (301) 496-3271.

Video Shows Eye from a Doctor’s Point of View

exam from a doctor’s point of view. It describes what the doctor sees when examining the retina

Getting a dilated eye exam is a great way to check the health of your eyes, especially if you are over 60, or at higher risk for eye disease. But aside from making your eyes hyper-sensitive to light, what does the exam accomplish? A dilated eye exam allows an eye doctor to detect many common eye diseases—including glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration—before symptoms begin. In many cases, these diseases are treatable. However, once symptoms begin, it may not be possible to restore vision that has already been lost.

In order to help people understand how a dilated eye exam works, what the results mean and how to discuss them with a doctor, NEI and the NIH Office of the Director have developed a new animation that shows the exam from a doctor’s point of view. It describes what the doctor sees when examining the retina (the light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye), macula (the part of the retina needed for sharp, central vision) and optic nerve (which connects the retina to the brain).

To see for yourself, watch the video at www.nei.nih.gov/eyeexam and share it with others.

Director, OD Staff Serve Dinner at Inn

NIH director Dr. Francis Collins and his wife Diane Baker and several staff members of the Office of the Director cooked and served dinner to Children’s Inn at NIH families on Jan. 6. The evening’s menu consisted of chicken and vegetable teriyaki, pizza pinwheels and cupcakes baked in ice cream cones. Other OD chefs (from l) Dr. Stephanie Devaney of the Office of Science, Outreach and Policy, Janet Lambert of OSOP, NIH deputy director for extramural research Dr. Sally Rockey and Daozhong Jin of OSOP.
At left, NIH director Dr. Francis Collins and his wife Diane Baker and several staff members of the Office of the Director cooked and served dinner to Children’s Inn at NIH families on Jan. 6. The evening’s menu consisted of chicken and vegetable teriyaki, pizza pinwheels and cupcakes baked in ice cream cones. Shown at right, are other OD chefs (from l) Dr. Stephanie Devaney of the Office of Science, Outreach and Policy, Janet Lambert of OSOP, NIH deputy director for extramural research Dr. Sally Rockey and Daozhong Jin of OSOP.

Cooper Gives NIH Director’s Lecture, Feb. 4

Dr. Max D. Cooper

Dr. Max D. Cooper, a professor of pathology and laboratory medicine at Emory University School of Medicine, will deliver the annual NIH Director’s Lecture (first of three) on “Tracing the evolution of adaptive immunity,” on Wednesday, Feb. 4, at 3 p.m. in Masur Auditorium, Bldg. 10. Cooper’s work focuses on the antibody-producing cells of the immune system; he is currently applying his research on lamprey immune proteins to studies of HIV. The lecture is part of the NIH Director’s Wednesday Afternoon Lecture series. For information and reasonable accommodation, contact Jacqueline Roberts, (301) 594-6747.

 

 


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