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Vol. LXVII, No. 5
February 27, 2015
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Briefs

Management Intern Program Recruits

The NIH Management Intern Program, a way to unlock a new career path, is recruiting Apr. 6-10. It is a highly competitive, 2-year career-development program for current NIH employees. MIs come from a variety of job backgrounds including both scientific and administrative fields. Upon completion of the program, MIs transition into an administrative-management career in one of many areas throughout NIH. Eligible employees are invited to apply. For program FAQs and details about eligibility, visit http://trainingcenter.nih.gov/intern/mi/.

Learn more by attending any of these information sessions, all of which are held from noon to 1 p.m.:

Mar. 20 Bldg. 31, 6C, Rm. 10

Mar. 24 Bldg. 10, FAES, Rms. 3-4

Apr. 1 Rockledge 1, Suite 4000, RT1

WSA Scholars To Present Work, Mar. 20

Dr. Bari Ballew Dr. Christine Jao
Dr. Barbara Nicol The 2014 WSA Scholars are (clockwise, from top left) Dr. Bari Ballew, Dr. Christine Jao and Dr. Barbara Nicol.

Each year, the NIH women scientist advisory committee selects two or three female FARE (Fellows Award for Research Excellence) winners to be honored as WSA Scholars for their outstanding scientific research. The 2014 WSA FARE winners will present their work at a symposium to be held Mar. 20 at 2:30 p.m. in Wilson Hall, Bldg. 1. A reception will follow the presentations. All are invited to attend.

The winners, and their topics, are:

  • Dr. Bari Ballew, National Cancer Institute, Telomere dysfunction caused by a germline mutation in the TEL patch of the telomere protein TPP1

  • Dr. Barbara Nicol, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Exploring the genetics of sex differentiation

  • Dr. Christine Jao, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Structural Analysis of a Bacterial Zinc Transporter.

Free Editing Help for NIH Fellows

The Fellows Editorial Board (FEB) was created in spring 2002 to meet the scientific editorial demands of postdoctoral and clinical fellows in the NCI Center for Cancer Research. Now, FEB provides free, fast and confidential scientific document editing services for the entire NIH and FDA fellow community.

At any given time, FEB has up to 40 members who edit submitted manuscripts, grant proposals, abstracts and other scientific documents for grammar, structure and clarity. However, FEB does not comment on scientific merit.

FEB is an all-volunteer organization composed of postdoctoral and clinical fellows. It accepts members from all NIH components; previous editing experience is not a requirement. However, due to the popularity of FEB, it is not uncommon for applicants to be on the wait list for 6 months.

The process is as follows: a senior editor assigns a manuscript to an associate editor. The associate then builds a team of three primary editors to thoroughly edit the submission. Although all board members review each submission for the weekly meeting, which is video-conferenced to satellite NIH campuses in Baltimore, Frederick and North Carolina, the team leads the editing discussion for the manuscript. All editors’ comments are compiled and returned to the author, usually within 10 business days.

All NIH fellows (postbacs, graduate students, postdoctoral fellows and clinical fellows) can submit their scientific documents to FEB. The research does not have to have been completed at NIH or FDA, but the submitting author must currently be an NIH or FDA fellow.

FEB has edited more than 820 documents to date; FEB-edited manuscripts have been published in journals including Molecular and Cellular Biology, Cancer Research, Oncogene, The Journal of Biological Chemistry, Molecular Cell and Neuroscience Research.

For more information, visit the FEB web site (https://ccr.cancer.gov/trainee-resources-editorial-board) for submission instructions and membership applications or send an email to FEB editors at ncieditors@mail.nih.gov.

Nobelist Moerner Gives Lecture at NIH

NIGMS director Dr. Jon Lorsch, NIH director Dr. Francis Collins and Dr. Catherine Lewis, director of NIGMS’s Division of Cell Biology and Biophysics and Moerner’s grant monitor. Dr. William E. Moerner

NIH grantee Dr. William E. Moerner (above, r), a 2014 Nobel laureate, gave a special NIH lecture, “The Story of Single Molecules, from Early Spectroscopy in Solids to Super-Resolution Nanoscopy in Cells and Beyond” on Feb. 5. Moerner shared last year’s Nobel Prize in chemistry with two other scientists for their work on super-resolution microscopy. In the NIH talk, sponsored by NIGMS, Moerner gave a “brief historical overview from the early days of single-molecule spectroscopy and imaging, which formed the foundation for some of these super-resolution methods.” Moerner, the Harry S. Mosher professor of chemistry and a professor of applied physics at Stanford University, received some of the first grants in NIGMS and other NIH cellular imaging initiatives that encouraged the application of physical science tools and approaches to biological studies. He was welcomed to NIH by (above, from l) NIGMS director Dr. Jon Lorsch, NIH director Dr. Francis Collins and Dr. Catherine Lewis, director of NIGMS’s Division of Cell Biology and Biophysics and Moerner’s grant monitor. The full talk can be viewed online at http://videocast.nih.gov/summary.asp?Live=15559&bhcp=1.

Workforce Diversity Initiative Kicks Off

Shown are (seated, from l) NIH’ers Dr. Joyce Hunter, Dr. Hannah Valantine, Dr. Francis Collins, Dr. Yvonne Maddox, Dr. Lawrence Tabak and Dr. Helena Mishoe; (middle row, from l) NIH’ers Dr. Pamela Thornton, Dr. Regina James, Dr. Elizabeth Wilder; Dr. Pamela Davidson, UCLA/CEC; Dr. Michelle Bennett, NIH; Dr. Rina Das, NIH; Dr. Leticia Marquez-Magana, San Francisco State University/BUILD; Dr. Lourdes Echegoyen, University of Texas El Paso/BUILD; Dr. Laura Kingsford, California State University Long Beach/BUILD; and Dr. Carlos Crespo, Portland State University/BUILD; (back row, from l) NIH’s Dr. Michelle Jones-London, Dr. Allison Scott, Dr. David Banks, Dr. Robin Broughton, Dr. Nelson Aguila; Dr. Gene D’Amour, Xavier University of Louisiana/BUILD; Dr. Farin Kamangar, Morgan State University/BUILD; Dr. Gary Kulek, University of Detroit Mercy/BUILD; Dr. Crist Khachikian, California State University Northridge/BUILD; Dr. David Burgess, Boston College/NRMN; Dr. William LaCourse, University of Maryland Baltimore County/BUILD; and Dr. Barbara Taylor, University of Alaska Fairbanks/BUILD.

The Enhancing the Diversity of the NIH-Funded Workforce initiative had its program kickoff recently in Bethesda. Supported by the NIH Common Fund and all 27 institutes and centers, the awards are part of a projected 5-year program to support more than 50 awardees and partnering institutions in establishing a national consortium to develop, implement and evaluate approaches to encourage individuals to start and stay in biomedical research careers. Shown are (seated, from l) NIH’ers Dr. Joyce Hunter, Dr. Hannah Valantine, Dr. Francis Collins, Dr. Yvonne Maddox, Dr. Lawrence Tabak and Dr. Helena Mishoe; (middle row, from l) NIH’ers Dr. Pamela Thornton, Dr. Regina James, Dr. Elizabeth Wilder; Dr. Pamela Davidson, UCLA/CEC; Dr. Michelle Bennett, NIH; Dr. Rina Das, NIH; Dr. Leticia Marquez-Magana, San Francisco State University/BUILD; Dr. Lourdes Echegoyen, University of Texas El Paso/BUILD; Dr. Laura Kingsford, California State University Long Beach/BUILD; and Dr. Carlos Crespo, Portland State University/BUILD; (back row, from l) NIH’s Dr. Michelle Jones-London, Dr. Allison Scott, Dr. David Banks, Dr. Robin Broughton, Dr. Nelson Aguila; Dr. Gene D’Amour, Xavier University of Louisiana/BUILD; Dr. Farin Kamangar, Morgan State University/BUILD; Dr. Gary Kulek, University of Detroit Mercy/BUILD; Dr. Crist Khachikian, California State University Northridge/BUILD; Dr. David Burgess, Boston College/NRMN; Dr. William LaCourse, University of Maryland Baltimore County/BUILD; and Dr. Barbara Taylor, University of Alaska Fairbanks/BUILD.

Collins Hosts FY 2016 Budget Chat

U.S. Congressman John Porter NIH director Dr. Francis Collins (above, r) held a meeting Feb. 2 for NIH’s fiscal year 2016 budget rollout. In a slide presentation in Wilson Hall, he outlined the President’s newly released budget request to Congress for $31.311 billion, an increase of more than $1 billion over NIH’s FY 2015 budget.
Dr. Carrie Wolinetz (r), newly appointed NIH associate director for science policy, chats with attendee Amanda Arnold.

NIH director Dr. Francis Collins (above, r) held a meeting Feb. 2 for NIH’s fiscal year 2016 budget rollout. In a slide presentation in Wilson Hall, he outlined the President’s newly released budget request to Congress for $31.311 billion, an increase of more than $1 billion over NIH’s FY 2015 budget. The amount includes $200 million for the new Precision Medicine Initiative, $100 million for antimicrobial resistance, $70 million for BRAIN and $50 million for Alzheimer’s disease. Collins also took questions from the audience, which included former U.S. Congressman John Porter (upper left, R-IL) and other representatives from patient advocacy organizations, universities and various NIH stakeholder groups. At left, Dr. Carrie Wolinetz (r), newly appointed NIH associate director for science policy, chats with attendee Amanda Arnold.

Photos: Ernie Branson

Next Protocol Navigation Lecture, Mar. 9

The IRP Protocol Navigation Training Program Seminar Series continues with a lecture to be held Monday, Mar. 9 from 2 to 3 p.m. in Bldg. 50, Conf. Rm. 1227/1328. The program is a trans-NIH effort to develop resources and tools and to provide training for intramural staff and contractors involved in protocol development, writing, coordination and management. Dr. Jerome Pierson and Dr. Jonathan Kagan of NIAID’s Division of Clinical Research will present “International Clinical Research: Hands-On Perspectives.” For more information, contact Marcia Vital, (301) 451-9437, vitalm@mail.nih.gov.

Sailing Association Open House, Mar. 4

The NIH Sailing Association invites everyone to its open house on Wednesday, Mar. 4 from 5 to 8 p.m. at the FAES House at the corner of Old Georgetown Rd. and Cedar Ln. Explore your interest in learning to sail and discover opportunities for sailing with NIHSA. There will be information about 6-week basic training classes, the club’s racing program and social activities offered by NIHSA. A fee of $5 at the door includes pizza, drinks and snacks. Cash bar for beer and wine—$2 each. Look for NIHSA posters and flyers around campus. For more information, visit www.nihsail.org/.


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