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Vol. LXVII, No. 8
April 10, 2015
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Briefs

10 Years of NIH News in Health

NIH News in Health publication samples

This month marks the 10-year anniversary of NIH News in Health, a monthly newsletter featuring accessible health information based on important current research results from NIH’s 27 institutes and centers and their extramural grantees.

NIH News in Health is written at an 8th-grade reading level and is not copyrighted. Readers are encouraged to reprint the articles and illustrations in print or web publications. Each issue directly reaches more than 200,000 subscribers, who in turn share the expert-reviewed information with their friends, family and communities. Recipients include community health clinics, senior centers, libraries and nonprofit organizations. Stories are also reproduced in a variety of languages at the local community level.

Articles over the publication’s 10-year history have ranged from the importance of healthy eating and physical activity to the microbiome, personalized medicine and the hazards of stress. “Our aim is to give people the knowledge and tools they need to improve their own health,” says founding editor Dr. Harrison Wein.

“The stories show how NIH’s wide-ranging research and expertise can directly affect our everyday lives,” adds editor Vicki Contie. The newsletter is published by the NIH Office of Communications and Public Liaison. You can sign up to receive it at http://newsinhealth.nih.gov/subscribe. Contact the editors about sending it to communities that you work with.

Postbaccalaureate Poster Day Set, Apr. 30

Postbac Poster Day is scheduled for Thursday, Apr. 30 at the Natcher Conference Center from 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. This year, Dr. Audrey J. Murrell, associate dean and professor, Joseph M. Katz Graduate School of Business, University of Pittsburgh, will present the keynote address at noon. The keynote will be followed by presentation of the Postbac Distinguished Mentoring Award(s) to NIH investigators selected by the postbacs. Poster Session I is from 10 a.m. to noon; Poster Session II runs from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m.

Poster Day provides an opportunity for postbacs to share research they have been conducting at NIH and at the same time develop their scientific communication and networking skills. Posters will be reviewed by teams composed of graduate students, postdocs and staff scientists/clinicians. Authors of the top 20 percent will receive a letter acknowledging their accomplishments.

Investigators, staff scientists and scientific administrators can make an important contribution to the event by visiting posters and engaging the authors in discussion. For more information, visit https://www.training.nih.gov/postbac_poster_day.

Berkeley’s Doudna Describes CRISPR Science

One of the hottest current fields in science is CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)-Cas genome editing. One of the pioneers of the field, Dr. Jennifer Doudna of the University of California, Berkeley, recently described how the field emerged during the past decade. Her talk, “CRISPR-Cas genome surveillance: From basic biology to transformative technology”—the annual NIH Director’s Margaret Pittman Lecture—can be seen at http://videocast.nih.gov/summary.asp?Live=15743&bhcp=1.

Photo: Bill Branson

 








One of the hottest current fields in science is CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)-Cas genome editing. One of the pioneers of the field, Dr. Jennifer Doudna of the University of California, Berkeley, recently described how the field emerged during the past decade. Her talk, “CRISPR-Cas genome surveillance: From basic biology to transformative technology”


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