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NIH Record  
Vol. LXVII, No. 17
  August 14, 2015
 Features
Content Syndication Helps Distribute Info Reliably, Quickly
Pérez-Stable To Direct NIMHD
Northwest Child Care Center Moving Forward
Burwell Recognizes NIH Innovation Awardees
New Northeast Bridge Construction Complete
NINR Hosts Center Directors Meeting
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Inn Celebrates 25 Years of Helping Pediatric Patients

NCI’s Dr. Lauren Wood moderated the anniversary event in Masur Auditorium.

NCI’s Dr. Lauren Wood moderated the anniversary event in Masur Auditorium.

Most parents would do almost anything to help their sick child. When children have rare, difficult to treat or undiagnosed conditions, they can be seen at the Clinical Center while they and their parents stay together at the Children’s Inn at NIH.

Many call NIH the “National Institutes of Hope.” The inn is a big reason for that title, explained NIH director Dr. Francis Collins at the inn’s 25th anniversary symposium held recently in Masur Auditorium. The event celebrated the inn’s role of assisting families who come to NIH for treatments that hold the prospect of improving the children’s health and even curing their diseases.

Since 1990, inn CEO Jennie Lucca said, the inn has provided “a place like home” for nearly 13,000 families. Although it sits on government property, the inn is a nonprofit charity supported through private contributions. Besides offering a free place to stay, the inn presents residents with a range of therapeutic, recreational and educational programs and services.


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Live Wires
Neurologist Tests Deep Brain Stimulation to Relieve Depression

When we feel sadness or grief, it’s usually a passing phase. But what if you can’t snap out of it? People with major depressive disorder often can’t remember the last time, if ever, they had a good day. They’re despondent, numb and disengaged because their anguish is immobilizing. Medicines, psychotherapy or other treatment might work for a time, but some chronically depressed patients don’t respond long-term or at all to standard measures.

“So if you can’t talk it, drug it or shock it, then go at it and modulate it,” said Dr. Helen Mayberg, a neurologist and professor at Emory University School of Medicine, at a recent NIMH lecture at Porter Neuroscience Research Center. Mayberg, with a team of neurosurgeons, psychiatrists, psychotherapists, biomedical engineers and imaging scientists, has been pioneering research on deep brain stimulation (DBS) to help clinically depressed, treatment-resistant patients.


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