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NIH Record  
Vol. LXVII, No. 19
  September 11, 2015
 Features
Longtime NIH Supporter
Stokes Mourned
New Campus Food Contract
Awarded
Rep. Sarbanes Visits NIDA Intramural Program
NIAMS Director Participates in Congressional Briefing on Sturge- Weber Syndrome
Kilmarx Named Deputy Director of Fogarty International Center
Grady Discusses Nursing Research, Health Policy
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The Biology of Aging
Researcher Studies How to Prolong Life, Stay Healthy

Dr. Nir Barzilai studies ways to age healthily.

Dr. Nir Barzilai studies ways to age healthily.

We all dream of that elusive fountain of youth. As we get older, we might stay young at heart but we aspire to be physically healthy into a ripe old age. Can we delay aging and agerelated diseases?

With aging comes an increased risk for dementia, osteoporosis, cardiovascular disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes, cancer and many other diseases.

“We’re not claiming aging is the reason for the diseases,” said Dr. Nir Barzilai, director, Institute for Aging Research, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, at an Aug. 6 geroscience interest group lecture in Masur Auditorium. “There are specific genetic and environmental influences for those diseases and those [influences] decide which disease you’re going to get first.” But there’s mounting evidence to support the idea that aging can be delayed such that we’re not just extending longevity, but also a healthier lifespan.

In a talk titled “How To Die Young at a Very Old Age,” Barzilai, an NIA grantee who is also director of NIH’s Nathan Shock Centers of Excellence in the Basic Biology of Aging, emphasized the need not only to treat disease, but also to target aging.


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Scholar-Activist Challenges Media Stereotypes of Nurses

Dr. MarySue Heilemann looks at nurse portrayals.

Dr. MarySue Heilemann looks at nurse portrayals.

Nurses are often unsung heroes. From providing round-the-clock assessment and bedside care to administering medicines, wound care, diagnostics and counseling, nurses are indispensable clinicians. Yet stereotypes in television, film and other media have long cultivated public misperceptions of the nursing profession. One nurse-turned-researcher/producer, Dr. MarySue Heilemann, is working to change that.

“Nursing has been called the glue, the core or the backbone of the health care system,” said Heilemann, associate professor, UCLA School of Nursing, at a recent NINR Director’s Lecture. “But despite our significance and our presence clinically with patients 24/7 in the hospital and all kinds of settings outside the hospital, the actual work nurses do remains mostly hidden and misrepresented in the media.”


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