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Vol. LXVII, No. 20
September 25, 2015
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‘Life: Magnified’ Images on Display at NIH

Developing nerve cells captured by Torsten Wittmann, University of California, San Francisco.

bubonic plague bacteria on spines in the digestive system of a rat flea, captured by NIAID’s B. Joseph Hinnebusch, Elizabeth Fischer and Austin Athman
Above, bubonic plague bacteria on spines in the digestive system of a rat flea, captured by NIAID’s B. Joseph Hinnebusch, Elizabeth Fischer and Austin Athman. At top, developing nerve cells captured by Torsten Wittmann, University of California, San Francisco. Below, strands of tubulin, a protein in the cell’s skeleton, photographed in the NHLBI lab of Clare Waterman using a high-resolution microscopy technique honored with the 2014 Nobel Prize in chemistry
strands of tubulin, a protein in the cell’s skeleton, photographed in the NHLBI lab of Clare Waterman using a high-resolution microscopy technique honored with the 2014 Nobel Prize in chemistry
Brain cells. Bone cancer. Ebola. Striking, close-up images of these and 10 other biomedical scenes now hang in the Clinical Center. You can see the photos, all produced by NIH intramural scientists or extramural grantees, in the corridor outside the NIH Library. The images are part of the Life: Magnified collection, which was recently on display at Washington Dulles International Airport and garnered extensive media coverage.

Magnified by as much as 50,000 times using powerful microscopes and imaging techniques, the photos showcase the rich diversity and activities of life at the cellular level. The images include healthy cells from the brain, eye and skin as well as the pathogens that cause bubonic plague and HIV. Some images feature model organisms commonly used in research such as zebrafish and fruit flies.

The complete Life: Magnified collection contains 46 images selected from more than 600 submitted by the scientific community. It was first displayed from June 2014 to January 2015 in Dulles airport’s Gateway Gallery, where it was seen by an estimated 5.8 million travelers. You can see the entire collection and download high-resolution versions of its images at www.nigms.nih.gov/education/life-magnified.

 

 

 


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