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Vol. LXVII, No. 20
September 25, 2015
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‘Adventure in Science’ Seeks Volunteer Teachers

Adventure In Science. Rebecca Burgess assists

Adventure In Science. Rebecca Burgess assists Tara Vidyababu (seated) in a DNA prep. AIS is currently recruiting teachers.

Adventure in Science (AIS), a non-profit science education program for children, is planning its 23rd year at NIH and is looking for volunteer teachers. The program, which meets on Saturday mornings October through March in Bldg. 10, is designed to show 8-11 year-olds the fun of science using hands-on activities—from building (and launching) model rockets to dissecting frogs, visualizing the activity of enzymes, measuring lung volumes and more. AIS teachers are mostly volunteers from the NIH community, from postdocs to institute and center directors. This is a great opportunity to exercise your teaching skills with an enthusiastic audience. You can volunteer for only one Saturday or for several. If you are interested in AIS, read the “About Us” section at www.adventureinscience.org. Then, if you want to volunteer, think about possible topics you might teach and send your contact information to Vathani Arudchandran (Arulvathani.Arudchandran@fda.hhs.gov) and Ed Max (edward.max@fda.hhs.gov). Enrollment is currently full for children in the program beginning this October. Registration for the following year’s program will open next spring and will be announced on the web site.

Marlena Wilson shows Aishani Bakshi what to look for as she dissects a squid. Benedetta Naglieri instructs Eli Beuhler (l) and Ryan Rariewa on measuring the activity of amylase from their own saliva.
Marlena Wilson shows Aishani Bakshi what to look for as she dissects a squid. Benedetta Naglieri instructs Eli Beuhler (l) and Ryan Rariewa on measuring the activity of amylase from their own saliva.
Students gaze at a cow eyeball about to be dissected by Ed Max. A volunteer from the National Museum of Health and Medicine enthralls a group of AIS students with a discussion of what can be learned from an examination of human bones.
Students gaze at a cow eyeball about to be dissected by Ed Max.





A volunteer from the National Museum of Health and Medicine enthralls a group of AIS students with a discussion of what can be learned from an examination of human bones.

Photos: Da Zhang, Ed Max


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