NIH Logo
November 20, 2015
Vol. LXVII, No. 24

Cover


previous story

previous story


Workshop Highlights Research Challenges, Needs for Preventing Elder Abuse

On Oct. 30, Nora Super, executive director of the White House Conference on Aging, welcomed participants to the NIH Workshop: Multiple Approaches to Understanding and Preventing Elder Abuse, a 1-day meeting of professionals with expertise in elder abuse, child abuse and intimate partner violence.

Part of a national priority to promote elder justice—a key focus of the conference—the workshop featured advocates and experts from research institutions, universities and health care facilities. Participants focused on the application of lessons learned across fields and the common challenges and opportunities in elder abuse, child abuse, intimate partner violence and related fields.

Presentations emphasized the emergence and evolution of research on elder abuse and the consequent significant gaps in data. Experts discussed the challenges of defining and identifying abuse and the promise of new screening and analytical strategies, particularly opportunities presented by new technology.

On hand at the workshop were (from l) Dr. Elizabeth Skowron, University of Oregon; Dr. Nathan Spreng, Cornell University; Dr. Cathy Spatz Widom, City University of New York; Dr. Mark Lachs, director of geriatrics, New York Presbyterian Health System; Marie-Therese Connolly, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars; Kate Saylor, NIH Office of the Director. Nora Super, executive director of the White House Conference on Aging
On hand at the workshop were (from l) Dr. Elizabeth Skowron, University of Oregon; Dr. Nathan Spreng, Cornell University; Dr. Cathy Spatz Widom, City University of New York; Dr. Mark Lachs, director of geriatrics, New York Presbyterian Health System; Marie-Therese Connolly, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars; Kate Saylor, NIH Office of the Director.

PHOTOS: BILL BRANSON
Nora Super, executive director of the White House Conference on Aging






 

back to top of page