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January 29, 2016
Briefs

Clegg To Give NEI ‘Audacious Goals’ Initiative Seminar, Feb. 11

Dr. Dennis O. Clegg

Stem cell biologist Dr. Dennis O. Clegg will present “Vision for the Future: Cell Therapy for Ocular Disease,” as part of the National Eye Institute Audacious Goals Initiative (AGI) Seminar Series in Neuroregeneration. His talk takes place Thursday, Feb. 11 at 4 p.m. in Lipsett Amphitheater, Bldg. 10.

Clegg is a professor at the University of California, Santa Barbara, department of molecular, cellular and developmental biology. He is also founder and co-director of the UCSB Center for Stem Cell Biology and Engineering and a co-principal investigator of the California Project to Cure Blindness. His research centers on neural development and regeneration with a focus on stem cell therapies for eye disease. Clegg has served on advisory boards for the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine and the NIH Center for Regenerative Medicine.

The AGI series explores topics relevant to regenerative neuroscience and medicine, with special emphasis on the visual system. The AGI is a sustained effort by NEI to catalyze research toward new therapies for disorders that affect the retina and its connections to the brain.

Author Ross To Speak at DDM Seminar

The Deputy Director for Management (DDM) announces the second DDM seminar of the 2016 series “Management and Science: Partnering for Excellence.” The event on Thursday, Feb. 11 from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in Masur Auditorium, Bldg. 10, will feature Howard Ross, who will discuss “Unconscious Bias.” He will focus on identifying and navigating unconscious judgments in our daily lives.

Videocasting and sign language will be provided. Individuals who need reasonable accommodation to attend should contact the NIH Training Center at (301) 496-6211 or the Federal Relay Service at 1-800-877-8339.

For more information about the series, visit www.ddmseries.od.nih.gov or call (301) 496-3271.

Bldg. 1 Coffee Bar in Flux

The Bldg. 1 Coffee Bar was closed indefinitely on Jan. 8. The Coffee Bar’s food service provider, affiliated with the Maryland Business Enterprise Program for the Blind, made the decision to cease its operations in this location.

The Coffee Bar was a new addition to Bldg. 1 and opened for business in June 2015. The Office of Research Services, Division of Amenities and Transportation Services, is currently exploring other options, with the goal to secure a food service provider who will enhance menu options, increase healthy food choices and provide excellent customer service. ORS seeks to install a new operator as soon as possible.

For questions, contact John Crawford, food services manager, (301) 496-8180.

U.S., Mali Cooperate on Tropical Diseases

NIAMS staff and Coalition co-chairs gather around NIAMS director Dr. Stephen Katz (c).
U.S. ambassador to Mali Paul A. Folmsbee (l) and Malian Minister of Higher Education and Scientific Research Mountaga Tall recently signed a memorandum of understanding to promote research on and training in tropical and infectious diseases. The United States and the Republic of Mali most recently collaborated on containing the spread of the Ebola virus epidemic outbreak in Mali last year. NIAID maintains an International Center for Excellence in Research (ICER) in Mali to develop and sustain research programs through partnerships with local scientists. Read more about the Mali ICER Program at www.niaid.nih.gov/about/organization/dir/Pages/maliICER.aspx.

PHOTO: U.S. EMBASSY, BAMAKO, MALI

NIH To Host Rare Disease Day, Feb. 29

Rare diseases affect an estimated 25 million Americans. On Monday, Feb. 29, NIH will host an event designed to raise awareness about rare diseases, the people they affect and current research collaborations.

Sponsored by NCATS and the Clinical Center, Rare Disease Day at NIH will take place from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. in Masur Auditorium, Bldg. 10. Speakers include Rep. Leonard Lance (R-NJ); NIH director Dr. Francis Collins; NCATS director Dr. Christopher Austin; Clinical Center director Dr. John Gallin; and NCATS Office of Rare Diseases Research and Division of Clinical Innovation director Dr. Petra Kaufmann. The event will feature presentations, posters and exhibits, tours of the Clinical Center and an art show. Admission is free and open to the public. In association with Global Genes, participants are encouraged to wear their favorite pair of jeans.

Prior to the event, on Feb. 22, NIH will host a Twitter chat on rare diseases from 2 to 3 p.m. with Collins and Austin. Join the conversation by following #NIHChat.

Learn more about Rare Disease Day at https://ncats.nih.gov/rdd or visit https://events-support.com/events/NIH_Rare_Disease_Day to see the agenda and to register. You can follow the event on social media at #RDDNIH.

Supervisory Workshop on Work/Life, Well-Being

In collaboration with the Office of Research Services, the Office of Human Resources is launching a new, free supervisory workshop titled Work/Life@NIH: A Supervisor’s Guide to Enhancing Workforce Well-being. It will provide an overview of workforce well-being and how it can benefit your organization; highlight the policies and programs NIH offers to promote workforce well-being; and provide supervisors with strategies to manage the use of various workplace flexibilities. The workshop is led by NIH subject matter experts and has been approved for 2 Continuous Learning Points for supervisory refresher purposes.

Registration is available now in the Learning Management System. You may register by searching for course ID #NIHWRD1003. Upcoming sessions are scheduled for:

• Feb. 17, 9-11:30 a.m., 31/6C10

• May 17, 9-11:30 a.m., 31/6C10

• July 14, 1-3:30 p.m., 10/FAES classroom 3

• Nov. 9, 1-3:30 p.m., RKL II/9100-9104

Limited space is available, so register now. For more information, email Courtney Bell (bellcd@mail.nih.gov) or Kelly Peralta (peraltakl@nih.gov).

Kandel Speaks on Art History

Nobel laureate Dr. Eric Kandel (l) of Columbia University laid aside his scientific work and spoke instead on art history in the opening Demystifying Medicine talk Jan. 5 in Masur Auditorium. He was introduced by NIH director Dr. Francis Collins (r). Kandel spoke on “The Age of Insight: The Quest to Understand the Unconscious in Art, Mind and Brain from Vienna 1900 to the Present,” which is also the title of his recent book.
Nobel laureate Dr. Eric Kandel (l) of Columbia University laid aside his scientific work and spoke instead on art history in the opening Demystifying Medicine talk Jan. 5 in Masur Auditorium. He was introduced by NIH director Dr. Francis Collins (r). Kandel spoke on “The Age of Insight: The Quest to Understand the Unconscious in Art, Mind and Brain from Vienna 1900 to the Present,” which is also the title of his recent book. The talk can be seen at http://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?19409.

PHOTO: ERNIE BRANSON

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