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August 26, 2016
Briefs

Goodman To Present NINR Lecture, Sept. 13

Ellen Goodman
PHOTO: THE CONVERSATION PROJECT

On Tuesday, Sept. 13, Ellen Goodman will present the 2016 NINR Science and the Public Lecture from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. in Lipsett Amphitheater, Bldg. 10. In her talk “The Most Important Conversation We’re Not Having,” she will describe the Conversation Project, a public health campaign and movement that works to change the way people talk about and prepare for their end-of-life care.

Goodman has spent most of her life chronicling social change and its impact on American life. She was one of the first women to write for the op-ed pages where she became, according to Media Watch, the most widely syndicated progressive columnist in the country. In 1980, she won the Pulitzer Prize for Distinguished Commentary. In 2012, Goodman founded the Conversation Project, which is dedicated to helping people talk about their wishes for end-of-life care. The project has the goal of changing our nation’s culture so that everyone’s wishes for end-of-life care are both expressed and respected.

The Science and the Public Lecture is the first in a series designed to highlight issues of relevance to the broader public. There will be a reception following the lecture, made possible by the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health. For more information and to register, visit www.ninr.nih.gov/directorslecture.

Ellen Goodman

Montana Forest Fire Affects RML

A forest fire erupted on the afternoon of July 31 in the Bitterroot Mountains, about 5 miles southwest of NIAID’s Rocky Mountain Laboratories in Montana. As shown in the photo taken by local Office of Research Facilities staff, the firestorm appeared to hover over the RML Integrated Research Facility. The blaze forced 24 RML staff to evacuate their homes for nearly a week and destroyed one employee’s home. In all, more than 800 residents were evacuated; 16 homes burned, as did 49 sheds, barns and garages. The fire did not threaten RML structures, but prompted employees to revisit procedures and protocols for emergency situations. RML leadership effectively used an incident command structure to keep its 450 staffers informed of fire developments, smoke mitigation and fire evacuation plans and personnel leave options. The NIH Recreation and Welfare Association branch at RML raised about $2,700 for the 10 local volunteer fire departments that responded to the fire. The organization coordinated about 40 RML volunteers to assist co-workers with evacuation needs.

PHOTO: BRYAN KERCHER

Register for the 33rd NIH Institute Relay, Sept. 22

The 33rd NIH Institute Challenge Relay will be held on Thursday, Sept. 22 in front of Bldg. 1, beginning at 11:30 a.m. The NIH Recreation and Welfare Association, members of the original NIH Health’s Angels running club and the ORS Division of Amenities and Transportation Services invite you to this year’s event.

The relay consists of teams of five runners, each of whom runs a half-mile loop around Bldg. 1. All institutes, centers, divisions and contractors are invited to enter as many teams as they wish. Each team must have men and women runners with at least two runners of the same sex. The fastest 2016team will have their names engraved on the Allen Lewis NIH Memorial Trophy located at the Bldg. 31 Fitness Center.

This year, registration will be done online at https://www.fedesp.com/nih/events/the-nih-institute-relay-2016/ and the fee is $15 per team. Each group leader is asked to provide the name and contact information for one volunteer; there need to be 26 volunteers for each of two heats for the relay to commence. Be sure to visit food vendors and event exhibitors as well. To volunteer or for more information, call the R&W office at (301) 496-6061.

NIEHS’s Wilcox a ‘Sammies’ Finalist

Dr. Allen Wilcox’s research has led to discoveries of environmental factors that affect birth defects, fundamental advances in understanding miscarriage and improved methods for studying fertility.
Dr. Allen Wilcox’s research has led to discoveries of environmental factors that affect birth defects, fundamental advances in understanding miscarriage and improved methods for studying fertility.

PHOTO: STEVE MCCAW

NIEHS epidemiologist Dr. Allen Wilcox is a finalist for one of the Samuel J. Heyman Service to America Medals, or Sammies. This is the second year that the Partnership for Public Service is adding a People’s Choice Award to the eight awards that will be chosen by the official selection committee.

Anyone with a Facebook account may vote once a day, between now and Sept. 9.

The organization’s web site featured a story on Wilcox’s achievements throughout his career as a groundbreaking researcher in the epidemiologic study of human reproduction.

You may support Wilcox by visiting the People’s Choice Award page (http://servicetoamericamedals.org/peoples-choice/) and voting once a day and by sharing the news with colleagues and friends.

Winners will be announced Sept. 20 at a gala celebration.


On June 29, members of NCI’s Office of Grants Administration hosted a Family Dinner Night at the Children’s Inn at NIH

NCI Office Supports Children’s Inn with Dinner, Donations

On June 29, members of NCI’s Office of Grants Administration (above) hosted a Family Dinner Night at the Children’s Inn at NIH. The theme was the 4th of July. “It was well appreciated, a huge success and great fun,” said Dianna Bailey, a grants management specialist. Other OGA activities for the inn have included a donation drive to offset the cost of household goods, personal care items, water and gift cards. At right is a photo of goods presented to the inn last December after an OGA drive.
photo of goods presented to the inn last December after an OGA drive

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